Checking the Pulse of the American Shopper

pulseFrom a retail perspective, it’s hard to find numbers or analysis of the past year without also finding the word “cautious” in close proximity. Holiday spending for 2014: Cautious. Consumer attitude from recent gasoline price drops: Cautious. Outlook for 2015…. You get the picture.

Given the depth of the financial crisis in 2008 and the habits of the post-crisis consumer, this attitude can hardly be blamed. For retailers, however, the state of the American consumer might better be described as “tempered.”

It describes a cohort that has been tried, toughened and come through stronger. That’s what MasterCard Global Insights research shows. Our most recent work on the attitude toward credit and debit spending — arguably a leading indicator for retailers — captures a more nuanced portrait of how Americans are feeling about the economy and their own pocket five years into the recovery. In short: The post-crisis consumer has learned some tough lessons and come through with a tempered but tactical attitude toward credit and debit usage, disposable income, and saving for the future. [Read more…]

Confirmit

confirmit_logo-smallConfirmit enables organizations to develop and implement Voice of the Customer, Employee Engagement and Market Research programs that deliver insight and drive business change. Confirmit’s clients create multi-channel, multi-lingual feedback and research programs that engage customers, empower employees, deliver a compelling respondent experience, and provide high Return on Investment.

Confirmit’s customer engagement model provides the power to listen to the Voice of the Customer, integrate it with financial, operational and free-form text data to generate powerful insight, and take action that will deliver effective business change and create competitive advantage.

RetailNext

RetailNextRN-Logo-H-v03.01-CMYK is the world-wide market leader and expert in retail analytics for brick-and-mortar stores. Its technology delivers comprehensive, real-time analytics that empowers worldwide retailers, shopping centers, and manufacturers to collect, analyze, and visualize in-store data. Using best-in-class video analytics, Wi-Fi detection, Bluetooth, and data from point-of-sale systems and other sources, the patented technology instantly informs retailers about how shoppers engage with their stores. The highly scalable RetailNext platform easily integrates with promotional calendars, staffing systems, and even weather services to calculate how internal and external factors impact customer shopping patterns. With the platform’s sophisticated yet intuitive tools, retailers can identify opportunities for growth, implement change, and evaluate success. RetailNext measures the behavior of more than 1 billion shoppers every year by collecting data from tens of thousands of sensors in retail stores and analyzing trillions of data points. Headquartered in San Jose, CA, RetailNext is a growing global brand operating in 40 countries.

The New Luxury Consumer? Think: Multiple Consumers

atk_luxuryThe luxury industry may have lost a bit of its luster lately:  in 2014, Prada’s third-quarter profits sunk 44%; LVMH sales growth has slowed down; and analysts downgraded their recommendations for some listed companies.
There are several reasons for this. First, weak economic performance in parts of Europe and Asia is deflating consumer demand in those areas. Second, societal shifts, including a crackdown on corruption gift giving in China and last year’s protests in Hong Kong, are stealing some of the industry’s cache. At the same time, a lack of truly innovative products has failed to energize consumers.

But there is a big and most important reason:  the luxury consumer base has changed. It’s not your grandmother’s luxury market today, which brings tremendous growth opportunity for the luxury brands that can evolve with the changing face of affluence and market to these new customers based on their individual needs. [Read more…]

What’s Missing From Online Shopping

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Last year, US e-retail sales hit $263 billion, according to Forrester Research Inc., representing 8% of total retail sales. The company predicts that by 2018, e-retail will reach $414 billion. While it’s a staggering number, it will still only account for about 11% of total retail sales. So why is online shopping still such a small piece of the retail pie? According to research from Cotton Incorporated, there’s room for improvement online.

Browse Before Buying

Though the majority of purchases still occur in-store, online is quickly becoming the first stop for consumers looking to shop for apparel. According to the Cotton Incorporated Lifestyle Monitor™ Survey, 84% of consumers say they browse for clothing online using a computer or laptop, while 45% say they use a smart phone, 39% use a tablet, and 18% use a smart television.

“We’ve seen strong growth in the percentage of consumers who browse for clothing online using smartphones, tablets, and smart televisions, and we anticipate those numbers will continue to grow as they reflect the behavior of younger consumers who were raised with the technology and are increasingly comfortable with it,” says Kim Kitchings, Vice President, Corporate Strategy & Program Metrics, Cotton Incorporated.

Indeed, according to Forrester Research Inc., 69% of US adults who regularly purchase items online end up buying about 16% of their products through e-channels, and both numbers are expected to grow as so-called “digital natives,” or those consumers born in the early 2000s after the advent of digital technologies, continue to increase their spending power. [Read more…]

Lou Gerstner Was Right: Consumer Spending Matters, Not Stock Price

mc_gerstnerUS consumers are discriminating as to where they spend, and while demand has come back in what may seem unexpected categories, there is emphasis on experience and on purchases as investment.

Readers of Lou Gerstner’s book, Who Says Elephants Can’t Dance?: Inside IBM’s Historic Turnaround, or anybody who has heard the legendary former IBM Corp. CEO speak, will remember some sage advice: pay no attention to the stock price.

Let’s expand on this. Pay no attention to the stock market unless, of course, you’re investing in it. But as an economic barometer, the stock market has proven to be a fickle and even inaccurate judge of global economic health. Making cogent statements thereby is a delicate process, and I would argue that the more reliable barometer is consumer spending. The stock market is at best a confirmation of one’s previous calculations, not a factor in any of them.

What drove Gerstner to make the statement was his epic turnaround of IBM in the last century’s final years. Many friends and associates had congratulated him on the company’s resurgence based on a rebounding equity price. Gerstner warned them the number meant little, and the hardest work was yet to do. [Read more…]

Defining the Value of Omnichannel Shopping

Mobile banking wallet on screen of smartphone isolated on whiteBefore investing in an omnichannel strategy, retailers need to understand the true value of this consumer shopping behavior and the opportunity it presents. A new MasterCard study suggests the right approach is to start with the customer. How does their omnichannel spending behavior differ from spending in a single channel?

Conventional wisdom suggests that retailers should invest in bolstering the omnichannel experience they offer consumers on the basis that more channels will result in increased sales. Makes sense, but merchants can either invest in an omnichannel strategy and technology because it seems like the right thing to do, or they can make informed decisions based on data that details the value to be gained from key customer segments. Imagine the following scenario: A working mother of two needs a simple dinner solution for the evening. She logs onto Pinterest for “quick kid-friendly dinner” and decides on the “Cowboy Casserole.” The list of ingredients she needs is automatically saved onto her mobile phone, and dropped into her local grocery store shopping app. She opens this app, and decides to pick up the order on her way home. She stops at the store, where her order is waiting in a cart. She notices a sale on blueberries and adds two pints to her cart. She picks up a single-serve sparkling water for her car ride home and a few magazines to wind down later. The kids love dinner and the mom has illustrated the type of behavior that merchants of all classes are moving to better serve. She is an omnichannel shopper. As such, she is highly sought after but not very well understood. [Read more…]

A.T. Kearney

ATKearneyA.T. Kearney is a leading global management consulting firm with offices in more than 40 countries. Since 1926, we have been trusted advisors to the world’s foremost organizations. A.T. Kearney is a partner-owned firm, committed to helping clients achieve immediate impact and growing advantage on their most mission-critical issues. For more information, visit www.atkearney.com.

Competing in the New Normal

Competing_in_the_new_normalThe struggle between retail titans and industry disruptors is in the news more and more often. We are all well-versed in how companies such as Etsy and Rent the Runway, both of which were named to CNBC’s Disruptor 50 list, have successfully exploited a niche within the marketplace.

There are disruptors changing the rules of the game and titans who are reinventing themselves on a daily basis. Disruption is daring, while reinvention is daring but also extremely difficult and exhausting. Some days, pushing water uphill feels easier.

So, what is the new normal? The United States is arguably the most hyper-competitive retail market in the world. With exponential growth being seen in emerging regions like India, Brazil and especially China, the US market will continue to face oversaturation from domestic as well as international competition. Going outside US borders to seek growth is tempting.

As Mickey Drexler, CEO of J. Crew, once said, “There are too many retailers. There are too many brands. There are too many designers. There are too many discount stores, and the predator online companies are selling discount like crazy.”

What is frightening is that this oversaturation is becoming ubiquitous worldwide. As a result, a sort of depressing sameness has settled across major and medium-sized cities around the world, even in the world of fashion, which should have the highest levels of distinction in the fastest moving consumer goods category of all.

The sea change shift is that rather than simply expanding geographically—which has been the classic approach to growth—new business models are quickly evolving … because there is no other alternative.

Competing to win in the fashion market requires that companies do not go back to traditional retail basics to find solutions. Customer service, great prices, fast delivery, brand awareness, an authentic brand—these are no longer enough.  In fact, they are the tickets to entry in this fast-paced marketplace. With all the omnichannel, e-com, customer-experience hype, we seem to be forgetting one key thing—the product. Let’s be honest: what do people actually get when they buy something? Garbage, even when sold as part of an amazing customer engagement process, is still garbage.

A new paradigm is required to be innovative and sustainable. For fashion, modern companies are returning to the future, focusing on these three foundational elements:

1. Newness and Unique Design

Fast-fashion is no longer a new concept; it is a business model that has changed the fashion industry forever. Fast-fashion has pushed companies to increase the number of drops through continuous replenishment. But in a seasonless market where everyone has access to the same trend forecasts, couture and ‘street’ photos and paparazzi snapshots, designers can no longer stay within the safety zone of following ‘predicted’ trends. As a consumer, if I see variations of the same trend over and over, and retailers are running with the herd and not giving me other choices, only price becomes a strong influencer. This is really a shame because uniqueness, creativity and design can be core strategic retail benefits to customers. And even more of a shame is that the US has both easy access to technology that can elevate creativity, as well as easy access to sheer creative talent. But are we levering this access? US fashion schools offer some of the best, most balanced programs in the world, yet many foreign students come to the US to learn, and then go back home to their native countries to apply their learnings (as competitors!).

2.Fit

It’s not going away. In fact, it’s more important than ever before. With more and more companies operating on a global scale, combined with the fact that morphologies vary greatly, coming up with an optimal size range to match fit remains elusive. This is one area where technology is really helping. Virtual fitting rooms and fabric libraries simulate the look of different materials; style and fit can also be simulated, adjusted and approved before a prototype is even made. Moreover, a virtual avatar can be simulated across size ranges and morphologies to accurately capture the nuances of today’s consumer. (Plus, avatars don’t get tired, need bathroom breaks, or change size and they always show up on time!)  According to fitsme.com, online garment sales alone have an average return rate of 13%, 77% of which is due to bad fit. This represents a massive potential impact on immediate sales as well as long-term brand loyalty.

3. Supply Chain

The supply chain is becoming the product engine. Brands, retailers and manufacturers are all rethinking their strategies to determine if greater vertical integration and proximity sourcing make sense for them. This can be seen especially in China and Mexico where traditional manufacturers are now developing their own brands. A lean approach to fashion development and manufacturing is an excellent opportunity to reduce cost, reduce time to market and boost innovation. Companies can gain greater control over the product itself, how it is developed, when it is available, and its price.

Three fundamental strategies: design, fit and the supply chain. Focusing on these key elements is critical for both disruptors and titans. Such is the opportunity and the new normal – and it’s there for the taking.

International Intrigue: How Retailers Can Gain Share of Cross-Border Spending

crossborderInternational travel has been remarkably resilient in the post-financial crisis period. In fact, MasterCard research shows that since 2009, international visitor arrivals and spending have grown faster than real global GDP. Despite its size and strong growth, cross-border spending is a challenging area for retailers. When international travelers arrive, many merchants have difficulty recognizing them, anticipating their needs and catering to them. Even worse, most merchants neither recognize the size of the cross-border opportunity nor understand their current share. This is important, since even a 1% share of a leading market such as New York or London is near $200m in annual revenue. As it does with so many retail issues, data can play an important role in gaining share of cross-border spending. Insights into spending and behavioral trends can help retailers understand their current share of wallet and provide the intelligence needed to attract more cross-border dollars.

The International Traveler of Mystery

For those who are successful at attracting the international traveler, the ‘prize’ can be substantial: MasterCard research forecasts that cross-border visitors to the 10 leading destination cities will spend $136 billion during 2014. Narrowing that down to the biggest cities for cross-border spending and the opportunity becomes even clearer. In London, the leading global destination this year, this translates to an average of more than $1,000 per visitor. Average spending is even more impressive for other major travel destinations, such as New York ($1,600) and Taipei ($1,700).

Retailers seeking to gain cross-border sales should consider four approaches to anticipate the arrival and needs of the cross-border customer, to capitalize on the opportunity:

1. Benchmark the Current Competitive Set

Retailers and other types of merchants typically lack data on their share of cross-border spending, and have even less visibility into their share of spending by visitors from specific countries. A first step should be to measure current performance and compare it to that of competitors. In doing that, merchants can gain valuable insights by analyzing key indicators based on recent transactions and determining how they stack up against their competitive set.

2. Leverage Existing Customer Base

After benchmarking competitive performance, retailers can capture a greater share of cross-border spending by analyzing existing customers. As an example, many types of merchants – including airlines, hotel chains and luxury fashion brands – have established relationships with travelers through loyalty programs. Analyzing the spending patterns of frequent traveling members of the program can help identify the merchant types with which members engage most frequently. This may uncover partnership and ancillary revenue opportunities for the brand.
Analyzing the membership of a hotel chain affinity program, for example, may show that affluent customers from certain countries engage frequently with particular luxury industries. Such insights may yield partnership potential as a means of attracting customers from those markets and gaining share of spend while they visit.

3. Understand Spending Habits of Cross-Border Customers

Another strategy to gain share of wallet with international travelers is to analyze past spending activity by international traveler customer segments for predictive insights. As an example, a retailer at a shopping mall in London could see that high-income customers from New York City are likely to have shopped for apparel before they come to the mall. The retailer may also notice that the international traveler segment frequents bookstores at some point after leaving the mall. These insights may help the retailer evaluate partnerships or category expansions.

4. Choose Influential Partners

Cross-border travelers interact with many different travel market participants, including airlines, airport authorities, tourist boards, car rental companies, hotel chains, online travel-related services and banks. These are potential partners to other merchants looking to grow their business with international travelers.

A tourist board, for instance, may wish to attract visitors from certain markets. From some markets, a high proportion of travelers will be affluent, while those from others will be predominantly business travelers. These different cohorts may favor certain types of retailers, restaurants and hotels during their stay. A tourist board will have an interest in connecting the two, both to improve the customer experience of the traveler and to drive business within its region. Insights from spending behavior patterns of travelers from these markets will identify areas of alignment and potential partnership between the tourist board and merchants in its region.

Cross-border spending is growing rapidly and should be of particular interest to retailers in geographies with high penetration of international visitors. With cross-border visitors to the 10 leading destination cities alone forecasted to spend $136 billion during 2014, the opportunity for merchants cannot be ignored and a critical first step is tapping into and understanding the right data and insights.

A version of the article appears in the Fall 2014 issue of the MasterCard Advisors “Compendium.”

Are You a Fashion Titan or a Fashion Disrupter?

“Let’s face it, the fashion business does not attract the nation’s best and brightest…”

As told to me by one of the titans of retail, the ex-CEO of a major American brand.

Doubts about my own personal career choice aside, he was right. With a few exceptions, fashion is still somewhat a backward business. What other industry has so little pure product innovation and relies solely on fickle, fleeting consumer desires to drive business? Unfortunately for us, there are no real trends anymore, but gradual evolutions in style due to the way information is constantly leaked and diffused. Sadly, Jorgen Andersson, formerly with H+M and now CMO of Uniqlo, agrees, calling fashion and consumer culture “generic.” [Read more…]

How Equinox Could Save Your Mall

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The Great Recession turned most US consumers into necessity-based shoppers, eliminating their need to spend a day or even an afternoon impulse shopping at the mall. But these changing demographics and shopping habits across the country have real estate developers getting creative – in some cases, by filling now-empty anchor stores with non-retail properties like fitness centers. Ironically, this emphasis on non-retail may be what woos consumers away from the convenience of online shopping and back to the mall.

Seventy-two percent of consumers say they prefer to buy separate apparel pieces at different stores, according to the Cotton Incorporated Lifestyle Monitor™ Survey, compared to the 28% who would prefer to purchase everything in one place.

“That number has really remained consistent over the last several years, indicating that the very nature of malls still holds strong appeal among consumers even as the traditional anchor store model has become outdated,” says Kim Kitchings, Vice President, Corporate Strategy & Program Metrics, Cotton Incorporated. [Read more…]