Macy\’s – The Distribution of Things
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\"macy\'sAgain, in Front of the Trend

I recently wrote about Macy\’s distribution brilliance. And even though the ink is hardly dry, here I am again. Actually, I am not going to focus on lauding what most people might view as a great Macy\’s marketing program with Plenti (a cross-brand and industry point-generating redemption deal), which I\’ll explain in a minute. This new collaboration is really a tactic, albeit very innovative, to support what I view as Macy\’s larger distribution strategy and vision.

My recent article was about Macy\’s understanding of the broader and more accurate definition of omnichannel. Too many retailers interpret omnichannel to mean simply two channels: online and brick-and-mortar stores.  So let\’s get it straight once and for all.  The old term multi-channel meant more than one channel of distribution.  The new concept omnichannel means \”all\” distribution channels. Under the multi-channel definition, company strategists would align operations, distribution, marketing and all other functions with the needs of each channel as if they were \”silos.\” For example, the store, catalogs, marketing strategies, etc., would all be tailored to the needs of the specific channel, assuming different customer behaviors for each.  Omnichannel, as Macy\’s and other enlightened retailers are employing the model, is the seamless integration of consumers\’ experiences in a matrix of all distribution channels, wherever and whenever the consumer wants it: stores, the Internet and mobile devices, TV, direct mail, catalogs, and now, even operating on other brands\’ or retailers\’ distribution platforms.

\”Plenti\” of New Distribution Platforms

Rite Aid, AT&T, ExxonMobil, Nationwide, Hulu, and Direct Energy

So, the Plenti deal basically adds many other distribution platforms to Macy\’s omnichannel strategy.
It\’s pretty simple.  All the aforementioned companies, including Macy\’s, are interconnected with each other through Plenti\’s program.  Each time a consumer spends a buck at any one of those companies, they receive a point (equivalent to a penny), which then can be applied to discounts at any one of the companies.

As so aptly described in WWD: \”Consider pulling into a gas station, filling up your tank and earning a point per dollar, then applying those points to get discounts on shoes at a department store, or cough drops at a drugstore.  Or imagine getting points for discounts at Macy\’s or Exxon just by paying for your auto or homeowner\’s insurance.\”

And while one could argue that these are not, by definition, used for distributing goods, it is, in fact, an indirect strategy of distributing the brand on non-related, but compatible industry and product categories. It all ultimately leads to expanded distribution, acquiring new customers as well as maintaining current customers who will be delighted to build up a bunch of points for new deals.

In fact, Macy\’s strategy might more appropriately be called the \”distribution of things.\”  Borrowing from the term, the \”Internet of things,\” which describes the interconnectedness of everything, Macy\’s is interconnecting and integrating all possible distribution platforms that engage their consumers wherever they may be.

Think about this, Macy\’s.  In the future, when you perfect the use of your \”big data\” and are able to profile each and every loyal customer and what they personally dream for in their lives, you will be permitted into their homes, to be downloaded into their \”global communications center\” from which they get important and timely information from you and other permitted brands. You will give them information about new styles that you know, from your database, they will love.  A fashion show invitation or Stella cocktail party can be hyped for their attendance.  And you might even be able to deliver products to them that they can keep or be placed in a Macy\’s return box to be  picked up by Instacart or some such service that will inevitably spring up over the next couple of years.

The big shift is that the home will be the final distribution platform. The “distribution of things,” indeed.

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