Internet of Things (IoT)

IoTA Connected Life

If you think the tsunami of new technologies, more spectacular one day after another, are now within your grasp of understanding, and soon to be mastered in implementation, do not pat yourself on the back and take a breather. The proverbial light at the end of the tunnel is a far bigger and faster tech train than the many you are just beginning to feel comfortable with. And it’s coming right at you. Yes, your business will soon ratchet up to another level of innovative opportunities and complex challenges.

We are hearing or reading the words IoT or the “Internet of Things” more frequently. It is the next technology mega-trend. And there are some early manifestations of it, from fitness bracelets to watches, connected refrigerators and automobiles, to thermostats and industrial equipment. But it’s still in the nibbling-around-the-edges phase. However, as breakthroughs in reducing the cost of sensors, processing power and increasing bandwidth continue, it will accelerate the ability to connect with more things, faster and cheaper. [Read more…]

Not Your Grandmother’s Neiman’s

RL_Blog_NeimansNeiman Marcus is not wasting any time as it marches into the new frontier, or the “wild west,” as many are calling it. And it’s headed right towards the intersection where technology and the Millennials connect. Neiman’s is recognizing the tsunami of new technologies being introduced on almost a daily basis, as well as the fact that Millennials will soon replace Boomers as the largest consumer segment. This next-gen cohort has not only embedded technology into every moment and movement in their lives, they also bring huge shifts to the marketplace in how they want to engage or be engaged by retailers.

First and foremost, understood by all retailers (except for the few with their heads still in the sand), they must promise a compelling experience to attract consumers to the store. This is especially true for the Millennials, who are more interested in pursuing style of life over the stuff of life. They desire many types of experiences over shopping and hanging out in malls. And since technology is their life, the Neiman’s that attracted their grandmothers will die with their grandmothers, if they don’t integrate technology into every aspect of their business, including an engaging experience in the store. [Read more…]

Tory Burch. Doing Almost Everything Right

tory_burch_2About a dozen years ago, sitting in her blue and white David Hicks and Billy Baldwin design-inspired kitchen in her 6000-square-foot Pierre Hotel co-op overlooking Central Park, Tory Burch set about to create an affordable clothing line that she and her friends would like to wear. By this time, Tory Burch was already something of a socialite and had appeared in the pages of Vogue and on the cover of Town & Country. Not entirely to the manor born, but close enough, Tory, a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, had worked in the fashion industry, not in design, but in advertising and public relations. Perhaps this is where she learned about marketing and branding, or perhaps she just has very good instincts.

The first Tory Burch boutique opened in 2004 on Elizabeth Street in Manhattan’s Nolita, now a fashionable retail stretch, but a somewhat more pioneering location at the time. With a $2 million dollar investment from then-husband Chris Burch and additional funds from friends and family, the store launched with multiple categories of clothing and accessories. In 2005, Oprah Winfrey discovered a Tory Burch tunic and pronounced it the next big thing. With Oprah’s endorsement, a unique fashion point of view that struck a chord with a certain crowd in Manhattan in its early days and some good exposure on Gossip Girl, fashion history was made. [Read more…]

The Bottom Is Near: Thanks to the Millennials

three girls chatting with their smartphones at the parkIt came in with a bang! And it will end with a whimper. I’m talking about the now over-used phrase “the race to the bottom” of price promoting and every method of discounting imaginable and unimaginable. It explosively ramped up around the turn of the century, accelerated through the recession, mainlined on steroids post-recession, and is now limping to its end. This is not a Ron Johnson-like prediction when he bet the bank during his brief and tragic tenure as CEO of JC Penney (and which I naively doubled-down on). I now believe he may have been ahead of his time believing that “fair and square” non-promotional pricing would be desired by consumers. Of course, the JC Penney customers not only didn’t love it, they hated it and walked out the door.

Well that was a different time and a different customer.

The Millennials are going to change it all. They are viewing the industry’s discount madness as an overwhelming, frustrating, and exhausting “paradox of choice” (too many deals and too confusing to even make a choice). They will not only become inured to the onslaught of ubiquitous deals 24/7, they will begin to disbelieve them and cynically expect that another better deal will pop up at any moment – which they will also not trust. How can they believe what the real value of any offering is at this point? [Read more…]

Enough With the “Rooming” Already

stein_blog_roomingI just finished the 54-page 2014 Accenture Holiday Shopping Survey; and while I’m still in a state of ‘stat-overwhelm,’ I’m also left with a nagging thought. With our culture’s unceasing need to simplify things (abbreviation-nation syndrome), we may be losing sight of the obvious. E-commerce and the relative newbie, mobile electronic  retailing, combined have become the greatest destabilizing forces for retailers in a century. Emblematic of this is our culture’s tradition for creating nicknames for any major new phenomenon.

First showrooming arrived, the moniker given to some of the 200 million or so smartphone-toting customers who began deploying their devices in store. Shoppers price-checked the retailer, which more often than not resulted in an abrupt exit to buy online or at a competitor. This new practice also revealed inconsistencies between the retailer’s in-store pricing and that of their own websites which caused a corporate conundrum. Showrooming’s roommate is the more recent webrooming, a tech-term that describes browsing online and then going into a store to make a purchase. [Read more…]

Walmart Collateral Damage

iStock_000043854262LargeWhat if Walmart opened a big fleet of new-format stores and no one came?

We might find out really soon. After years of tinkering with its small-format, food driven Neighborhood Market model, Walmart has started to roll them out in earnest. There are now about 350 Neighborhood Markets and Walmart expects to open them at the rate of about 200 per year, ultimately achieving about 2,000 stores.

At about 40,000 square feet each, Neighborhood Markets are integral to Walmart’s strategy for future growth. Its main store model, the huge food and nonfood supercenter, needs a boost since it has just about reached market saturation and is facing dwindling consumer engagement.

And in an unexpected twist, Neighborhood Markets in many areas are pulling dollars from the pockets of the same supercenters shoppers, so net sales increases aren’t growing at the anticipated rate. In fact, Walmart’s net sales are actually dropping in some areas. And guess what? Local supermarket operators are starting to relax about the competitive threat Neighborhood Markets pose. [Read more…]

Wellness on the Verge of a Revolution

shutterstock_185901890The past 50 years have seen a transition in healthcare from the Marcus Welby model of a kindly physician taking charge, even ownership, of a patient’s well-being to a phenomenon called participatory medicine, where physicians play the role of senior, expert collaborators with an individual in their plan for health.

In the past, the medico/hospito/pharmaco players were gatekeepers who doled out medical information and care with schedules at places that served their needs. Today’s patients demand greater and more convenient access to health information and medical care. They want care to be provided with the convenience of any other retail service. Simply said, they want it now, wherever they want it… now.

Healthcare On Demand

An early manifestation of “retail” convenience in healthcare was the standalone, limited service clinic. This movement began in the workplace with employers contracting with companies such as CHS Health Services to operate health clinics. These services have offered free services to employees as a benefit, and for the employer as a means to reduce absenteeism and healthcare costs. CHS, newly merged with Walgreens-owned Take Care, operates more than 500 workplace clinics for major US companies. [Read more…]

Goldman Sachs 21st Annual Global Retail Conference Key Takeaways

The traditional September back-to-work event for investors, marking the end of the summer lull (after a hectic wrap up to Q2 earnings in August and prognosticating about the back-to-school selling season) is the Goldman Sachs annual conference. This two-day affair is chock full of investor presentations and Q&As with 50+ public companies, private equity investors and the GS team. There was no real breakthrough news at the event, and our stalwart retail leaders seem to be soldiering on working hard to create compelling customer experiences as a point of differentiation. But it’s tough out there on the retail battleground front, and omnichannel is settling in as the strategy of choice for survival.

I believe the overriding takeaway of the conference was put forth in Robin Lewis’s recent blog, The Forecast: Share Wars For Rest of 2014, that ran a week ago, which quoted Macy’s CEO, Terry Lundgren, who kicked off the conference on the first day. The blog forecasted zero growth based on Mr. Lundgren’s quote: “The rebound that we were all expecting in this year hasn’t happened. The consumer has not bounced back with the confidence that we were all looking for. And so the performance I think we had in the second quarter, and we expect to have in the second half, is going to be a continuation of what we’ve been able to do over the last several years — and that is to capture market share and get the most out of the consumers that are in our stores.” [Read more…]

Is Alibaba Really Worth It?

alibaba_newOn the verge of becoming the biggest initial public offering in US history, one has to wonder if it’s really worth the $187 billion some analysts are projecting. As we witness Jack Ma, former schoolteacher and founder of Alibaba, strut across a stage portraying himself as Jeff Bezos and Steve Jobs combined, at least he’s talking the talk. Walking the walk, as we all know, is a horse of a different color.

And to that point, off stage he’s been on a wandering and random acquisition binge, making some 30 investments since the beginning of the year, worth close to $7 billion. Whether or not he was just trying to find stuff to invest all of the cash gushing through the business, the deals he has made seem highly questionable. [Read more…]

Stalking the Cyberazzi

iStock_000027023380SmallDo you ever get the ominous feeling you’re being watched or followed? Well, you are!

They know what you’re doing and where you are at any given time; what you eat; the car you drive; ailments you have and whether you’re pregnant; divorced; trying to lose weight; cheating on your spouse at some sleazy motel; or the color of the upholstery in your Lear Jet.

They know every predilection, quirk and fetish you thought were buried deep in the recesses of your private life. You are fair game and their job is to create a dossier on you from cradle to grave.

Disturbing isn’t it? But this is the shadowy world of the data broker, companies that track every aspect of people’s lives and lifestyles. They are the keepers of a Pandora’s box of consumer data and it’s there for anyone to open—for a price! [Read more…]

Touch Screens: Innovation or Distraction?

electronic-superhighway-namjunepaikOur visual language continues to evolve faster than our spoken or written word. That evolution sits at the confluence of disruptive everything; from the viability of broadcast media to the science of visual merchandising. It also circumscribes a generational shift in how and where we access information.

If our screen owning habits are changing, how has that affected our screen watching habits in retail and other places outside our home? Ten years ago, our measurement data suggested that a television-based image attracted twice the number of eyeballs as a static paper-based image. Remember the video walls in stores and shopping malls that were some weird commercial rendition of a Nam Jung Paik art installation? It was brilliant the first, and maybe also the second time you saw it, but eye-straining thereafter.

[Read more…]

Monitoring the Digital Watercooler

iStock_000023334231SmallEver since the first merchant set up a tent at the Grand Bazaar in Istanbul, the world’s first mall, or Sears met Roebuck, employees have complained about employers.

But there’s a new twist on the old dynamic thanks to that digital water cooler, a.k.a.  social media. It’s where the “look-at-me” or “listen-to-me” generation spews out opinions and every excruciating detail of their daily lives in 144-character rants or selfies.

Companies are wondering about their options when it comes to protecting their reputations from sometimes-libelous comments or disciplining employees who violate social media policy. [Read more…]