GoEnjoy.com

“Personal Commerce” and Preemptive Distribution

There are two strategic concepts that are imperative for any consumer-facing business to achieve success in the 21st century: personalization and preemptive distribution.

goenjoy

As former Apple executive, Ron Johnson’s Genius Bar creation and Apple’s entire retail model exemplified these strategies early on. Now Johnson is leapfrogging his original creation through the launch of goenjoy.com. Essentially, Enjoy sends an expert to deliver a product purchased on their site to each and every consumer upon demand, and within hours. The expert then advises the customer how to integrate and use the product in ways that best fit into their personal lifestyle. And this hour-long consultation is free. Thus, the personalized Genius Bar experience occurs wherever the customer is. [Read more…]

By Design: The Studio Xfinity Experience

xfinity_studioWhen the Department of Commerce began tracking online sales in 1998, e-commerce made up about only 0.2 percent of all retail sales. By 2013, online sales had increased 50-fold. If that’s not enough to rattle brick-and-mortar retailers, note that at the height of the Great Recession in 2008-2009, online sales was the only retail category that kept growing. Today, with every imaginable product just a click away, retailers need to offer more than attractive wares to get shoppers back into the offline store, and the majority haven’t come up with a great solution.

Companies like Apple and Prada solve the problem with stores that invite customers to participate in a brand experience that encourages emotional connections and associations between consumers, the store and their products. These contextual retail environments are not only responsible for showcasing how the product works, they’re also stages for events and larger group experiences. These retail environments transcend the buying experience beyond a basic, primary function to gateways into a community, collective experience. [Read more…]

Retail’s Walking Dead: These Brands Have Been Revived, But Will They Survive?

zombiesThere’s a hit TV show, “The Walking Dead,”  in which a nasty plague wipes out almost the entire human race, then allows some of the decaying departed to get up, roam around, and attempt to eat the few still-living folks, who from then on spend their days and nights in a constant, terrifying quest for survival.

It’s hard not to see the parallels in retail.

Over the past year or so, several defunct retail brands, like Radio Shack, Fortunoff, and others, have been reincarnated. But unlike in the AMC show,  where we don’t know what’s allowing the zombies to keep stumbling forward, we do know what’s allowing these retailers to start moving again: all the cash sloshing around in the coffers of investors who seem to believe these brands still have a future. [Read more…]

Retail Reality Check

retail_realityOn June 4, 2015, The Robin Report and FGI co-hosted a retail symposium focusing on new approaches and technologies that are changing the way retailing is done. The panel moderated by long time industry icon, Paul Charron, with a cross section of seasoned industry veterans representing brand, ecommerce and luxury retail, had a lively discussion. Despite varied points of view and the irrefutable and growing impact of technology on everything we touch, two lasting truisms of retail were underscored: product and service. What has changed is the way retailers and brands address these requisites to meet new consumer expectations and demands; plus developing the new systems that support communications and commerce. [Read more…]

The Elevation of Denim

denimelevationIt is the Go-To for Going Out

Denim has seen its share of evolution in the 140-plus years since Levi Strauss started selling blue jean overalls. In its modern iteration, it may be the item of choice for the smart, stylish dresser. With the rise of “athleisure” in casual apparel, the denim category is becoming elevated, with designers showing it on their runways, and brands offering it in custom fits, new finishes, and looks that are geared for the club as well as the office.

The Rise of Denim in Workwear

Eric Goldstein, owner of Jean Shop, a bespoke denim store in Manhattan, says a big part of his business is for men who want denim for “going out” or for work. “We do a tremendous amount of raw denim, and you can wear that with a leather shirt or jacket on top,” Goldstein says. “Our typical customer is the more articulate man, like the banker who wants to look casual, but cool and clean. Denim is being worn to work everywhere — New York, London, and the financial world. It’s not just for casual Friday anymore. Part of the staple work wardrobe is dark, crisp jeans. Our customers come into our store specifically looking for it.”

Goldstein’s customers reflect data that show denim remains consumers’ top apparel choice for a variety of occasions, from work to going out to dinner to running errands. More than a third of all consumers (36 percent) prefer denim jeans for work, followed by casual and dress pants (27 percent each), according to the Cotton Incorporated Lifestyle Monitor Survey. Men are significantly more likely than women to prefer denim for work (41 percent versus 32 percent).

WGSN’s junior’s editor, Sarah Owens, says denim has become an acceptable look in the workplace, especially given the premium options now available both in fit, finish, and feel. She says, “It’s quite common now for women to wear a pair of relaxed, boyfriend jeans with a tailored black blazer — creating a high/low aesthetic that has been circulating among Fashion Week street style trends for the past few years.”

Lorna Buford, editor of DenimBlog, says jeans are such a wardrobe staple that consumers will wear denim as a standard work item, unless they have to wear a uniform. “Plus, with the added comfort that jeans now have, it’s a bonus,” she says. Women have the option of pairing them with heels and a dressy jacket or smart sweater, while men just need to think “dark and neat.” AskMen advises male readers to leave their club denim with intricately stitched pockets at home.

The premium denim company DL1961 even has a category named “Office Denim” on its web store to help consumers make the right style choice for their particular job situation. The brand has also added to denim’s comfort factor by introducing lines like “hybrid” “intelligent,” and “DLX” denim that increases movement, retains shape, and even protects from odor-causing bacteria.

“The other direction we see denim headed is a workwear story with raw constructions in rich indigo reworking classic silhouettes in more elongated fits,” Owens says. “This has also been executed in black to give a more contemporary touch to workwear themes.”

On the Streets to on the Go

As favored as denim is for work, it’s preferred even more for shopping or running errands (61 percent), according to Monitor statistics. That’s distantly followed by casual pants (15 percent), athletic pants/shorts (10 percent), shorts (7 percent), and leggings (5 percent).

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Click to Enlarge

Of course, the idea of looking fashion forward when shopping or running around town with the kids was made popular by celebrities. Whether it’s Jessica Alba pushing her baby carriage or Justin Timberlake grabbing a coffee, the look is about the right jeans paired with the right shoes and accessories. That may be why more than four in 10 consumers (41 percent) say they prefer to wear denim jeans when they want to look and feel good in an outfit, followed by casual bottoms (20 percent) and dress pants (17 percent), according to the Monitor data.

Of course, looking good is important when going out to dinner, and denim is also the top apparel choice among both men and women combined (37 percent), the Monitor survey shows. That’s followed by casual pants (26 percent), dress pants (17 percent), dresses (11 percent) and skirts (4 percent) for women, and athletic pants/shorts (2 percent).

“The demand for denim in a more formal or ‘going out’ setting has been increasingly apparent, even before the athleisure trend started to gain momentum,” Owens says.

Buford says she sees both men and women wearing denim in a dressier setting. “I still see people wearing their favorite black or indigo blue skinny jeans with heels and blazers — those are popular for going out.”

Denim Hits the Runways

More denim is also being shown in current designer collections. “The designers really promoted denim on the runways for pre-fall and pre-spring,” says the Doneger Group’s fashion director, Roseanne Morrison. “There’s been a ’70s vibe with the flare leg, the one-piece denim coverall, denim dresses. There’s also been some ’80s styles with the high waist and baggier fit. So it’s a new collection of denim looks that are coming out. We’re also seeing some lighter washes and original indigo without stretch,” she adds.

Owens says the runway has had an influence on the denim category, giving it a wider, dressier appeal. Men and women will continue to see it as more of a “going out” item, she says, “as we enter into the more premium aesthetic that is currently being influenced by current catwalk and trade show trends. From the catwalks, we have been seeing denim take on a more premium aesthetic, with elevated and glossy constructions on more sophisticated pieces such as the tailored denim set at Rag & Bone, Bottega Veneta, and Michael Kors.” Owens continues, “This new renaissance for the denim market gives it a polished identity originally established back in spring/summer 2011 by designers such as Celine and Derek Lam.”

501 Ascending

Levi’s is the originator of denim jeans. At the last National Retail Federation show in New York, James Curleigh, Levi’s global president, said the company is focusing on its core, but “going for more.” “There’s this notion of should you just do what is expected or should you do more?” he said. “Well, guess what? We’re going to do both.”

Levi’s is still the worldwide leader in denim. In fact, it tops the list of favorite brands of denim jeans among Monitor survey respondents at 32 percent. Levi’s is continuing its traditional 501 jean, and last month introduced the 501 CT (Customized & Tapered) line. The 501 CT is offered in a range of authentic denim washes inspired by San Francisco and California style, the home of Levi’s and the original 501 jean.

The brand is also expanding both high and wide. At the high end, it’s offering its $750 Lot 1 custom, made-to-measure jeans. At the same time, its Commuter Series, featuring reflective seaming and U-lock storage on the waistband, is one of its fastest-growing denim platforms. “Icons don’t remain icons forever unless you continue to innovate around them,” Curleigh said in his presentation.

Trend Tracking

At the recent PROJECT menswear show at the Jacob Javits Center in New York, many denim brands were on display, including Anonymous Jeans of Los Angeles. This maker featured innovative styles such as a 100 percent cotton skinny fit jean with a sarouel drop -— à la the harem pant. Among the many vendors, buyers could also find denim with waxed and leather-look finishes, as well as jeans in a range of colors.

The evolution toward better finishes and different fits is important, especially as denim is the top apparel item among consumers (28 percent), for times when they want to “be stylish or fashionable,” according to the Monitor data. That’s followed by dress pants (25 percent) and casual pants (17 percent).

Those looks are right on time for today’s customer. “Denim is here to stay,” says Jean Shop’s Goldstein. “And in men’s, the classic 100 percent cotton denim is favored. It’s a product you wear your whole life. You can wear clean and crisp with a jacket and tie, and then three years later use it to paint the house or do some other DIY project. We collect jeans in the store. So people can wear their jeans for years, then trade them in when they buy a new pair. They become vintage. And they all tell a story. And with the new pair, the next story begins.”

Catherine Schetting Salfino
Fashion Retail Reporter

Catherine Schetting Salfino covers fashion and retail. Her work has appeared in the menswear
publications Daily News Record, Women’s Wear Daily, Saks POV, and the Sourcing Journal.

Birth, Life and Death: A Retail Cycle

murraysRob Kaufelt walked into Murray’s Cheese on Bleecker Street in New York’s Greenwich Village in the early ’90s and noticed a sign saying the store was closing after a 50-year run. The owners were tired, the neighborhood was changing, and the lease was up. Rob came from a family of grocers. He was a deli man who was used to getting up early and, at that moment, was out of work. His latest store had failed. On a whim, Rob made an offer on the business and was shocked when it was accepted. He moved it across the street for cheaper rent and started cutting cheese.

One thing led to another: Cheese classes, catering, wholesaling to restaurants, an e-commerce business, an outpost in Grand Central Terminal, a Murray’s Cheese Bar restaurant, and a deal with Kroger. By the end of 2015, there will be some 250 Murray’s Cheese outposts in Kroger stores across the country. Rob and Murray’s are evangelically getting Americans past Vermont cheddar and Wisconsin flavored Jacks. Whoever Murray was, he probably couldn’t imagine cheese becoming so chic, and his family is likely regretting not keeping at least a piece of the action. Rob, needless to say, is doing very well and has more grown-up toys than any man I know. [Read more…]

Retail Design: Much More than Meets the Eye

retaildesignThe character of the places where we live, work, and, of course, shop, have a direct effect on our thoughts and emotions — whether we are aware of it or not. Everyone is reminded of this when we enter a majestic cathedral or a grand department store. Or when we feel so vulnerable as we navigate the unfamiliar underground passageways of a subway. It is extremes like these that make us fully aware of the impact of space and place. Our acute sensitivity to our surroundings is always influencing our behavior — often unconsciously. When we shop, every aspect of the store’s design is acting on our emotions — whether we want it to or not. One could argue that these largely unconscious emotions are no match for our conscious reasoning when it comes to guiding our shopping behavior and purchase decision-making. Right?

Not so fast. The growing and compelling body of behavioral research popularized in bestsellers like “Predictably Irrational,” “Nudge,” and “The Power of Habit” all point to the unconscious as the unseen master of our frequently irrational behavior. Nobel Prize winner Daniel Kahneman, author of “Thinking, Fast and Slow,” argues that the unconscious is firmly in the driver’s seat. He says our “thoughts and behaviors may be influenced by stimuli to which you pay no attention at all and even by stimuli of which you are completely unaware.” Surprisingly, he found that in many cases we are, in fact, more strongly influenced by such subtle stimuli when we are not aware of them. He concludes, “The main moral…is that our thoughts and our behavior are influenced, much more than we know or want, by the environment.”

Space and Place

So what does this all mean for retail design? It tells us that every aspect of the retail environment matters because it directly influences behaviors and decision-making, and, therefore, has a direct impact on business performance. Yet many retailers do not consider the effect of store design a key metric. Consumers know the power of a place intuitively just by recalling various shopping experiences. Think how specific thoughts and emotions surface when shopping at edgy Urban Outfitters versus optimistic Uniqlo; or cheerful Target versus austere Costco; or at impeccable Chanel versus flamboyant Versace.

In each case, the retail environment is made up of a multitude of design components: light, color, materials, sound, scent, the shape and size of the space, etc. There is endless variety within each design element. Think of color, for example; each color affects us differently. To complicate matters, the ways these design elements can be combined is truly infinite. So how do we begin to make sense of the design possibilities?

retaildesign_2The Power of Storytelling

Before we choose and compose the elements of retail design, we need a story to tell. For branded retailers, that story is an expression of the brand identity. Sometimes called brand vision, brand identity is perhaps the most important concept in retail design because it serves as the inspiration for, and framework on which, a retail concept is developed. It is key to the success of the design, but brand identity is a concept that is often poorly understood.

When you or I, for example, think of the brand Burberry, various impressions come to mind. Some of those impressions might be quite simple — like its signature red, black and tan plaid or its classic trench coat. Some of these impressions might be more complex, likely inspired by some notion of Britishness. All of the impressions that exist in our individual minds can be thought of as “brand images.” They are the images that form in our minds.

Brand identity, on the other hand, is what the brand is saying, or trying to say. It is based on the brand’s core values, fundamental substance, and essential character. Brand identity is that unique combination of attributes that define the brand’s aspiration, promise or dream. It is “the center of the universe” that serves as a frame of reference and inspiration for everyone who works on the brand, not the least of all the designers of the retail environment.

So does every brand have a brand identity that can serve as the basis of great retail design?

When a painter sets out to create a portrait of a mythical figure, such as an ancient Greek god like Poseidon, Aphrodite or Dionysus the task is already halfway done because there is so much existing material with which the artist can work. For example, the nuanced character of the wine-loving Dionysus has been richly revealed in countless stories. The artist’s task is to interpret and then depict the character and temperament of Dionysus in a recognizable form. In the same way, the task of the retail designer is to interpret the brand identity and bring it to life in many dimensions. While every brand has a brand identity, it is not always as clear and accessible as the legend of Dionysus. Sometimes it is concealed, or worse, misunderstood.

Branded Environments

The character of the brand is also sometimes ignored by narcissistic retail designers who are intent on placing their own imprint on the store design, rather than serving as an interpreter of the brand. The first essential step in creating an engaging and powerful retail environment is a clearly articulated view and deep understanding of the brand identity.

Indeed, to maximize a brand’s economic contribution, all manifestations of the brand — retail environment, product, logo, promotion, service and even corporate policies — must reference the same “center of the universe.” In other words, the consumer-influencing power of the brand can only be fully realized when, as they say, everyone is singing from the same hymn book. Within luxury, we can see this coherence most clearly realized by Chanel, where a quietly elegant modern “less-is-more” sensibility is systematically applied across all product categories and promotional campaigns. The store is the physical manifestation of this sensibility where refined luxurious materials are consistently composed and applied with impeccable craftsmanship.

A different approach is Tommy Bahama’s brand identity. This brand is based on an idyllic, refined, tropical island lifestyle where one is more likely to wear silk shirts and tailored pants than Speedos and a T-shirt. The store design reflects and reinforces this vision through the use of sophisticated tropical references. In keeping with a refined aspirational aesthetic, there are no fishing nets draped across the ceiling, no faux pirate chests or Tiki totems. Instead, the island references are subtle, the materials refined — finely woven grass cloth, white bead board, wide-plank wood floors and ceiling fans. Caribbean wooden shutters are used throughout to evoke the memory of tropical sunlit days and balmy breezes. The store layouts are regular and ordered with a formality of design to reinforce the notion of a stately home. The result is pleasing, accessible and casual but also sophisticated.

At the Millennial end of the spectrum, Anthropologie’s bohemian “flea-market chic” stores have irregular layouts, mismatched furniture and fixtures, and authentic-looking folk-inspired art. The stores are celebrations of the strange beauty of imperfection. And, by inference, they acknowledge and allow you to celebrate your individuality. The coherent artisan store design actively brings the brand to life. It complements the eclectic merchandise assortment and helps imbue the product with cultural meaning — which ultimately justifies its price.

As consumers, we instinctively recognize retail environments as different as Anthropolgie, Chanel, Tory Burch, and Giorgio Armani, where the designs actively reinforce and reveal each brand’s identity. These retailers are exceptional. They have an integrated strategy that communicates their position and personality to consumers. Too many branded retailers fail to fully extend their brand identity to the store. This is a major missed opportunity. The store, as the center of the omnichannel universe, represents the most compelling opportunity to influence customer choice, leveraging consumers’ high sensory sensitivity to every aspect of their environment.

Solomeo, the Italian Medieval hill town surrounded by the fertile countryside of Umbria, is the headquarters of cashmere brand Brunello Cucinelli. The architecture, landscape, history and culture of this special place are a rich source of inspiration. This place, interpreted through a romantic philosophy, is at the center of the brand identity — which is beautifully revealed in the product and promotional campaigns — but not in the stores, which are generic gallery-like spaces. While the neutral retail environment focuses attention on the product, there is more to the brand than the product. And this is clearly demonstrated simply by looking at the rich Brunello Cucinelli digital presence. It won’t be easy, but it is time to bring this beautiful brand to life at retail.

Perhaps the most compelling reason for retailers to focus on using good design to bring the brand to life at retail is to satisfy the human heart and mind’s ongoing search for a coherent story. As humans, we are, to a fault, pattern seekers. We jump to conclusions and are wired to see a whole that is greater than the sum of the parts. Our natural instinct is to connect the dots, making visual and emotional sense of the seemingly disconnected threads of a story. Retailers can make our job as customers infinitely more satisfying by creating an integrated plan with coherent design that touches every part of our experience with their brand. It is not just pleasing; it is profitable.

Retail Awakening

Entire store chains are declaring bankruptcy and liquidating; department stores are transitioning to specialty stores; the leadership carousel at the top of organizational charts is spinning faster than ever; and online retailing titans are … opening brick-and-mortar stores?

There may never have been such a tumultuous time in the retail industry, one both rich in opportunity and rife in peril — both simultaneously.

So, I ask you, as a retailer, how are you sleeping at night?

New Retail Reality

Retail is not “evolving.” The pace and scope of change makes it so much more than an evolution, and the term “revolution” has morphed into a rather tired, trite cliché. Label it as you wish, but retail’s new reality includes:

  1. A disruptive convergence of channels;
  2. A newly empowered consumer who is clearly in charge; and
  3. A deep understanding that what worked in years past won’t work going forward.

[Read more…]

Tracking and Winning the Revolution

revolutionHey, are we having fun yet? Let’s think about where we are today. Is it somewhere in the early exciting phase of the retail transformation that we know is possible? Or are we held back by the fear of failing to make this shift and ultimately be snuffed out?

Here is where we really are: At the intersection of the art and science of retailing, converging on technological steroids, serving an omnipotent consumer who expects and demands the satisfaction of their dreams wherever they may be, whenever, how and how often — and instantaneously.

Daunting, complex, disruptive — these are just a few of the ideas describing the awesome challenges facing us in this profoundly transformational era.

Traditional brick-and-mortar retailers across all channels are in the process of seamlessly integrating technology, the Internet and m-commerce into the omnichannel model, while at the same time mining big data, configuring apps, and selecting from the endless stream of experience enhancing gizmos, gadgets and augmented reality for the delight of their shoppers. [Read more…]

The Grooming Boom: This One’s Gonna Stick

Martial Vivot at his salon on West 39th Street in Manhattan, Friday February 11th, 2011.

Mampering. Manscaping. Guy-brows. There are lots of lame new monikers attached to a bonafide beauty movement with big-bucks potential: The rise of guys as committed, trend-savvy – and, dare one say it, glamorous – consumers of product and services.

Have we been here before? Kinda. Since the mid-Aughts, there have been a handful of ship-on-the-horizon upticks in the men’s grooming market, enough to embolden such establishment brand behemoths as L’Oréal Paris and Dove to roll out initiatives like Men’s Expert and Men+Care, respectively.

But while L’Oréal SA and Unilever (the corporate papas of L’Oréal Paris and Dove) can afford to take a flyer on a new product range that may or may not jibe, here’s how you know when the rising guy tide is poised to lift all boats:

A) When tiny niche brands gain traction right out of the launch gate; [Read more…]

I’m Worth it!

Worth Summer Campaign_My House is More Than a HomeBrand’s High-Touch, High-Tech Service Business Model Attracts Busy, Fashion-Conscious Women

As the apparel sector gravitates toward cheaper products, relentless promotions, and declining service, a very different microtrend is taking hold. Direct-to-consumer luxury apparel company Worth Collection Ltd. is providing hands-on service with a high-tech twist — and no discounting.

When she answered the door at the Worth New York showroom on New York’s West 57th Street, Dana Kendrick took only a few minutes to size me up — literally and figuratively. “You’re a size 2,” she announced, “and you like classic, updated styles and dark or neutral colors.”

The stylist ushered me into a beautifully paneled room lined with racks of clothing samples from which she began to pull a selection of items. Then the questions started. Was I looking primarily for clothes for work or for social events? Have I thought about wearing color around my face? What are my most urgent wardrobe needs? [Read more…]

Pirch, Lululemon, Cabela’s, Burberry, Apple: What Do They Have in Common?

Addictive-BrandsThese brands are not retailers.  They are neurologically addictive experiences, co-created by the brand and their dopamine-addicted consumers.  And not so incidentally, the experiences happen to take place in physical buildings. And oh, yes, because the customers are addicts, they buy tons of the brand’s stuff and they can’t get back to those experiences fast enough for their next fix.  By the way, for those of you who don’t know what dopamine is, it’s a chemical in the brain that gets released every time we have an elevated experience. It provides feelings of euphoria, self-satisfaction, wellbeing, and can lead to addiction.

The dopamine-releasing brands headlining this report (and there are others) are such because the experience they have developed requires that the customer participate in creating or shaping the that experience to satisfy their own personal desire at the moment they engage with the brand. [Read more…]