Let’s Get Physical

letsgetphysicalThe Real Reason E-Commerce Merchants are Opening Stores

When asked why he robs banks, the notorious Willy Sutton answered: “Because that’s where the money is.”

Several high-profile e-commerce merchants are venturing into the world of brick-and- mortar for the same reason. Bonobos, Trunk Club, Nasty Gal, Warby Parker, Rent the Runway and Birchbox are just a few of the big e-names opening stores. Though they tout them as an invaluable way to showcase their brands and engage with consumers, it turns out these shops might also be an unavoidable route to reaching their financial potential.

Late in the Aughts, when most of these companies came into being, venture capital was plentiful for tech businesses, which is how they were positioned. But today, pure-play e-commerce is so last decade. [Read more…]

Retail’s Darkest Secret: The Deficiency Knowledge Gap

Store format redux from retail’s emerging trends in 2015 has proven that retailers are marching ever forward in this disruptive industry landscape. Big format stores are investing in smaller format editions, department stores are dabbling in specialty and online e-tailers are dipping their toes into the sea of physical stores.

However, despite all of the market research, strategic development, capital investment and operational execution of newly designed stores, retailers must not overlook brick-and-mortar retail’s darkest secret — and perhaps largest problem in general — “the knowledge deficiency gap” of associates. Customers are coming through the door armed with an arsenal of researched information on products and pricing. The hidden truth is often the customers know more about the brand, products and policies than the associates in the stores. [Read more…]

How Consumers Pocket The Change In Global Oil Prices

pocketoilchangeProbably the biggest global economic story since the collapse of the credit-based global economy in 2008 is the implosion of petroleum prices, which has had a direct, if lagging effect on retail sales in the U.S.

As of this writing, the price of a barrel of crude oil has recently gone below $45. The global economic situation is volatile enough to potentially reverse this trend, however, for the moment the  benefit remains with the consumer. Thus it’s worth taking a look at the economic and spending behavior that follows oil price declines because it has implications for business and industry across the country. [Read more…]

Internet of Things (IoT)

IoTA Connected Life

If you think the tsunami of new technologies, more spectacular one day after another, are now within your grasp of understanding, and soon to be mastered in implementation, do not pat yourself on the back and take a breather. The proverbial light at the end of the tunnel is a far bigger and faster tech train than the many you are just beginning to feel comfortable with. And it’s coming right at you. Yes, your business will soon ratchet up to another level of innovative opportunities and complex challenges.

We are hearing or reading the words IoT or the “Internet of Things” more frequently. It is the next technology mega-trend. And there are some early manifestations of it, from fitness bracelets to watches, connected refrigerators and automobiles, to thermostats and industrial equipment. But it’s still in the nibbling-around-the-edges phase. However, as breakthroughs in reducing the cost of sensors, processing power and increasing bandwidth continue, it will accelerate the ability to connect with more things, faster and cheaper. [Read more…]

Overfranchising: When Category-Killers Just Can’t Stop Cannibalizing

overfranchisingMaybe you’re Maybelline.

And maybe, because you’re Maybelline, you produce one of the most beloved mascaras of all time. Yes, Great Lash is one for the ages, a perennial box-office champ for the last 44 years. In this era of here-today, gone-tomorrow product launches, that preppy pink and green tube of makeup magic is in a class by itself.

In the prestige arena, Lancôme has enjoyed a similarly mammoth success story. Though its Définicils High Definition Mascara is 20 years younger than Great Lash, urban legend has it that one is sold – somewhere, globally, from Boston to Beijing — every three minutes.

Clearly, these two brands have carved-out massive slices of the brutally competitive mascara pie, proffering products women the world over genuinely adore. [Read more…]

Stampede to Organics Awakens Sleeping Giants

wholefoodsWhole Foods has succeeded beyond all expectations, but, strangely, that’s not all good for Whole Foods.

Whole Foods was founded 35 years ago in Texas based on the premise that there had to be a safer way to produce food than the mass-manufactured and over-processed approach. (Deep background: Whole Foods was originally named Saferway, a poke at supermarket chain Safeway.)

The Whole Foods concept was to leave conventionally manufactured food behind wherever possible in favor of natural and organic food, and to put a heavy emphasis on fresh. The concept also was that consumers would warm to the idea and pay a premium for such products. Development came slowly to Whole Foods because at the time, there was little consumer buy-in for such an idea. [Read more…]

Ghost Malls: Creative Destruction

ghostmallsIn the horror story of the declining fortunes of the American shopping center, the central character is the “Ghost Mall” – abandoned, forlorn, and lifeless — but looming, casting a post-apocalyptic pall over the American Dream. The website, DeadMalls.com, provides ample evidence that ghost malls are real and that they appear to be a growing insidious blight across America. The eerie photos show boarded-up entrances, broken glass, empty storefronts and hulking monolithic edifices surrounded by desolate unkempt parking lots. Hollywood even used a ghost mall to symbolize menace and hopelessness in last year’s psychological thriller “Gone Girl.”

Frightened yet? Well don’t be. In a country with an astounding 23 square feet of shopping mall space for every man, woman and child – representing almost 70% of the world’s supply — it should come as no surprise that some obsolescence and creative destruction is inevitable…even desirable. [Read more…]

Soar Wars

Look up in the sky! It’s a bird…it’s a plane. No, it’s those Louboutins you ordered.

That might not be too far from reality given the frenzy over drones and their potential in retail.

We have the fertile mind and tongue-in-cheek attitude of Amazon’s Jeff Bezos to thank for that. Since he unveiled Amazon’s flying fantasies on CBS 60 Minutes last year, there are stories almost daily about their commercial use. Bezos is not alone. DLH is already doing drone deliveries in Germany, and FedEx and Google are working on it here in the U.S.

In Japan, which is always serious about technology, the Yamaha Motor Company is developing drone technology and the government has formed a panel to encourage private companies to come up with ideas on how and where they can be used in “drone zones.” [Read more…]

The Case of the Missing $32 Billion

Missin-32billionMultilevel/Pyramid Marketing Schemes Lure Unsuspecting Consumers through FTC Loophole

Don’t look now, but dozens of companies, starting with Amway back in 1979, and more recently Herbalife, the supplements company being challenged as operating a pyramid scheme by activist investor Bill Ackman, have been diverting billions in sales every year away from traditional retailers across the health, beauty and general merchandise industries.

Multilevel marketing, or MLM, is a simple model that enriches those who start it at the expense of those who join later. The premise is simple, and there are few barriers to entry. A multilevel marketer pulls together a line of products, puts a brand name on it, and develops an enticing sales spiel which has, as its primary attraction, the ability, for those who make a bulk investment in these products, to profit from commissions earned when friends, neighbors, and family members become distributors, make a similar bulk investment, and recruit other friends or family members to do the same. They all will get a commission on those and all subsequent purchases that those friends and their recruits make. Everyone back up the line to the original seller gets part of the commission as well. The process creates an exponential geometric growth pattern which, in theory, would eventually encompass all potential prospects and leave later entrants no one to recruit. [Read more…]

Why Kale Will Save Retail…

kale_new …And Other Lessons From European Retail’s Foodie Heroes

As many of us remember, the 2014 Chanel Fall/Winter show was a foodie dream for those who love fashion. A monumental moment celebrating the merging of fashion and food, Lagerfeld transformed the Grande Palais into the chicest of supermarkets, with over 100,000 products, ranging from Coco Flakes to Chateau Gabrielle wine.

An ode to the most fashionable trend of the moment? Or perhaps the more literal…food is fashion is food.

The fashion world’s biggest names have embraced food in a big way. NY-based Related Companies revolutionized the concept of retail dining with its 2002 launch of the NYC Time Warner Center, a fashion mecca on the West Side, anchored by Whole Foods and chef superstars. Les grands magasins of Europe have elevated food to a level of epicurean artistry with open kitchens showcasing the top chefs at work alongside thousands of food products from around the world. [Read more…]

Pirch – The “Third Place” For Kitchen and Bath Lovers

pirchWho would have thunk that hanging out in a kitchen and bath appliance store could replicate the Starbucks experience for coffee aficionados and Apple for computer lovers? Well, thunk again. Pirch, as in perching, or sort of feathering your nest in a totally fun and interactive experience, is the reason consumers will flock (pun intended) to Pirch as a “third place” to hang (work, home and Pirch). Just as Starbuck’s and Apple disrupted how coffee and computers were sold and consumed, Pirch is disrupting the appliance world with a fundamentally new and co-created experiential model.

Founded in 2009 on the vision of its CEO, Jeffrey Sears, and Chairman, Jim Stuart, their goal was to make shopping for kitchen and bath appliances “inspirational and joyful.” Originally named Fixtures Living, it was changed to Pirch in 2013, meant to more accurately suggest a perch or nest. “Perching is like feathering your nest, roosting at home. It’s a feel-good name,” said Sears in a PRNewswire article. [Read more…]

Macy’s – The Distribution of Things

macys_distributionAgain, in Front of the Trend

I recently wrote about Macy’s distribution brilliance. And even though the ink is hardly dry, here I am again. Actually, I am not going to focus on lauding what most people might view as a great Macy’s marketing program with Plenti (a cross-brand and industry point-generating redemption deal), which I’ll explain in a minute. This new collaboration is really a tactic, albeit very innovative, to support what I view as Macy’s larger distribution strategy and vision.

My recent article was about Macy’s understanding of the broader and more accurate definition of omnichannel. Too many retailers interpret omnichannel to mean simply two channels: online and brick-and-mortar stores.  So let’s get it straight once and for all.  The old term multi-channel meant more than one channel of distribution.  The new concept omnichannel means “all” distribution channels. Under the multi-channel definition, company strategists would align operations, distribution, marketing and all other functions with the needs of each channel as if they were “silos.” For example, the store, catalogs, marketing strategies, etc., would all be tailored to the needs of the specific channel, assuming different customer behaviors for each.  Omnichannel, as Macy’s and other enlightened retailers are employing the model, is the seamless integration of consumers’ experiences in a matrix of all distribution channels, wherever and whenever the consumer wants it: stores, the Internet and mobile devices, TV, direct mail, catalogs, and now, even operating on other brands’ or retailers’ distribution platforms.

“Plenti” of New Distribution Platforms

Rite Aid, AT&T, ExxonMobil, Nationwide, Hulu, and Direct Energy

So, the Plenti deal basically adds many other distribution platforms to Macy’s omnichannel strategy.
It’s pretty simple.  All the aforementioned companies, including Macy’s, are interconnected with each other through Plenti’s program.  Each time a consumer spends a buck at any one of those companies, they receive a point (equivalent to a penny), which then can be applied to discounts at any one of the companies.

As so aptly described in WWD: “Consider pulling into a gas station, filling up your tank and earning a point per dollar, then applying those points to get discounts on shoes at a department store, or cough drops at a drugstore.  Or imagine getting points for discounts at Macy’s or Exxon just by paying for your auto or homeowner’s insurance.”

And while one could argue that these are not, by definition, used for distributing goods, it is, in fact, an indirect strategy of distributing the brand on non-related, but compatible industry and product categories. It all ultimately leads to expanded distribution, acquiring new customers as well as maintaining current customers who will be delighted to build up a bunch of points for new deals.

In fact, Macy’s strategy might more appropriately be called the “distribution of things.”  Borrowing from the term, the “Internet of things,” which describes the interconnectedness of everything, Macy’s is interconnecting and integrating all possible distribution platforms that engage their consumers wherever they may be.

Think about this, Macy’s.  In the future, when you perfect the use of your “big data” and are able to profile each and every loyal customer and what they personally dream for in their lives, you will be permitted into their homes, to be downloaded into their “global communications center” from which they get important and timely information from you and other permitted brands. You will give them information about new styles that you know, from your database, they will love.  A fashion show invitation or Stella cocktail party can be hyped for their attendance.  And you might even be able to deliver products to them that they can keep or be placed in a Macy’s return box to be  picked up by Instacart or some such service that will inevitably spring up over the next couple of years.

The big shift is that the home will be the final distribution platform. The “distribution of things,” indeed.