The New Luxury Consumer? Think: Multiple Consumers

atk_luxuryThe luxury industry may have lost a bit of its luster lately: in 2014, Prada’s third-quarter profits sunk 44%; LVMH sales growth has slowed down; and the share prices of recently listed luxury companies have fallen by a quarter.

There are several reasons for this. First, weak economic performance in parts of Europe and Asia is deflating consumer demand in those areas. Second, societal shifts, including a crackdown on corruption gift giving in China and last year’s protests in Hong Kong, are stealing some of the industry’s cache. At the same time, a lack of truly innovative products has failed to energize consumers.

But there is a big and most important reason is that the luxury consumer base has changed. It’s not your grandmother’s luxury market today, which brings tremendous growth opportunity for the luxury brands that can evolve with the changing face of affluence and market to these new customers based on their individual needs. [Read more…]

Is IKEA the Most Influential Retailer of the Past 25 Years?

shutterstock_202577677Let me cut to the chase. Yes.

Because say what you want about Walmart SuperCenters, H&M, Uniqlo, Restoration Hardware or even Amazon, none of them— not one—would exist in their present form if Ikea hadn’t come along to totally change the rules of retailing.

Ok, you’re saying, Shoulberg, you’ve been downing too many of those Swedish meatballs and have clearly lost your retail smarts. That may be true, but I stand by my Ikea statement.

And I’ve got the proof to back it up. But first, a quick refresher course on this Nordic retail operation that doesn’t easily fall into conventional models. Started in Sweden in 1943 by a 17-year-old named Ingvar Kamprad, named after a typical Scandinavian mash-up of his name and the farm and town where he grew up (take that, Macy’s and Walmart), the company opened its first American store in 1985 in the King of Prussia, Pennsylvania, area. [Read more…]

Vegan Is the New Black

dana_veganWhat’s more mainstream-American-beauty than Christie Brinkley? Christie Brinkley selling her upcoming face and body de-agers on HSN, that’s what. And for an extra dose of apple-pie wholesome, how about a Christie Brinkley beauty counter at Kohl’s?

But here’s what isn’t so by-the-book about Christie Brinkley Authentic Skincare: just like the 60-year-old stunner herself, it’s 100 percent anti-animal cruelty. In fact, it’s vegan. As a decades-long vegetarian and staunch wildlife advocate who spearheads anti-poaching missions in Africa, Brinkley made damn sure her eight-SKU range doesn’t contain a trace of animal anything.

If this were 10 – even five – years ago, Brinkley’s product positioning might have been deemed a gamble. Yes, the line’s core raison d’être is anti-aging; vegan is only one chapter of the story she’s telling. But the fact that Brinkley will be able to riff about why eschewing animal ingredients and testing is important to her — on the massive platform that is HSN – speaks volumes about where the beauty industry is headed these days. [Read more…]

Canada Goose – Keep Warm, Be Cool

gooseLike most New Yorkers I made it through last winter’s Polar Vortex with many layers and ‘Hot Hands’ in my pockets, but going into this season, I knew I had to replace my very well worn 10-year-old Bogner and 12-year-old Moncler down jackets. I asked a friend, younger and hipper than I, what she recommended. “Canada Goose” she said, “cheaper and cooler than Moncler.” I’d never heard of Canada Goose, but, once aware, the red white and blue Canada Goose expedition patch logos were suddenly everywhere in New York City. The parkas are more function than fashion, many trimmed with coyote fur around the hood. PETA has objected, but celebrities, including Matt Damon, Daniel Craig and Claire Danes have been photographed in theirs. Last season, Canada Goose was featured in the US Magazine “Who Wore it Best” section. Was it Lucy Liu, Cameron Diaz, Maggie Gyllenhaal or Emma Stone? Kate Upton wore a white Canada Goose parka over a white bikini bottom on the cover of the 2013 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit issue. Photographed in Antarctica, the headline reads, “Kate Upton Goes Polar Bare.” [Read more…]

Price Chopper’s Name Game

PriceChopperAlthough it doesn’t happen often, one of the most momentous decisions a company’s board and top executives can make is to change the customer-facing name of the company.

Sometimes, such a change can go well, for example when Macy’s changed the disparate department-store banners it had acquired over time to the Macy’s name itself. Now only Bloomingdale’s remains as a separate banner. There was some initial consumer pushback, especially concerning changing the name of Marshall Field’s in Chicago, but that settled down and now Macy’s enjoys the benefit of being able to stage company-wide, national promotions and advertising campaigns.

In the supermarket space, several companies have changed store banners for various reasons; some went well, some didn’t. Years ago, Food Town changed to Food Lion, which went well. The name change of Lucky supermarkets to Albertson’s went less well.

After 40 years, there’s a name change in the offing for Price Chopper supermarkets in upstate New York and New England that seems to be premised on some especially dubious reasoning. [Read more…]

The Magic of Christmas Should Just Be the Beginning

happy woman in a Christmas cap opens the magic box giftIf the only effort you make with those you love were once a year, you’d likely be left alone at Christmas. So why do brands and retailers show the love disproportionately at Christmas and then revert to the same-old, same-old throughout the rest of the year?

The simple response is because you follow the money and the holidays are when shoppers are spending. So you make hay. But this strategy, one that’s all too common, points at a serious problem.

Right now in the UK, retailers are in the middle of their annual advertising war. This tradition involves trying to top one another through 60+ second TV ads designed to make you to cry. But strangely, I’d even say stupidly, if you’re so moved by these ads to actually leave your sofa and go to the store, all you’ll find is crowds, a bit of tinsel, steep discounts, and the same old store you likely opted out of the rest of the year. What moved you to tears, exactly? Perhaps this is why the growth of online shopping climbs on its relentless ascent.

I recently hosted a panel discussion with a group of retail executives from Disney, Selfridges, Google, and Intel, among others. A key point they made was the crucial need for clarity of meaningful shopper purpose if retailers are to succeed in today’s market. This purpose recognizes that the limited wallet we all chase for our success has a myriad of choices for what to buy, where, and at what price. Providing only one shopping solution won’t produce success.

While there is greater pressure to spend at this time of year, the fact is people love discovery and the seduction of new things at any time. There’s no seasonality to desire. And this offers retail’s great opportunity: the ability to tap into an always-on emotional state to entice people to come into the store and then keep coming back.

A perfect example of a retailer that does this exceptionally well, a personal favourite of mine, is Selfridges. They make it their business to constantly innovate, to make their store a destination not just a shop all year long. Their view is that the store is a theater of dreams, requiring constant care and attention to capture peoples’ imaginations. For Selfridges, Christmas is just an excuse to add another level of experience to customers. This strategy has made shopping at Selfridges an incredibly special experience. In return, they are rewarded with an abundance of new shoppers added to their loyal customers who have a deep emotional engagement to the Selfridges unique brand of retail. The in-store experience is so powerful that shopping online at Selfridges.com defeats their true purpose and value.

Which brings me back to Christmas. The mythical magic of this holiday showcases stores at their best. It is our retail stores that create the stage set for creative, sentimental, joyous, dreamy holiday memories. Who can forget the childhood memory of sitting on Santa’s lap? And it isn’t just about the stuff. It is the power of creating a meaningful experience.

My challenge is: Why isn’t it Christmas year-round? Shoppers expect it. And in the competitive environment in which we now operate, we are being asked to create something special all year long. If we can do it once a year, we can sustain it for 12 months.

The Bottom Is Near: Thanks to the Millennials

three girls chatting with their smartphones at the parkIt came in with a bang! And it will end with a whimper. I’m talking about the now over-used phrase “the race to the bottom” of price promoting and every method of discounting imaginable and unimaginable. It explosively ramped up around the turn of the century, accelerated through the recession, mainlined on steroids post-recession, and is now limping to its end. This is not a Ron Johnson-like prediction when he bet the bank during his brief and tragic tenure as CEO of JC Penney (and which I naively doubled-down on). I now believe he may have been ahead of his time believing that “fair and square” non-promotional pricing would be desired by consumers. Of course, the JC Penney customers not only didn’t love it, they hated it and walked out the door.

Well that was a different time and a different customer.

The Millennials are going to change it all. They are viewing the industry’s discount madness as an overwhelming, frustrating, and exhausting “paradox of choice” (too many deals and too confusing to even make a choice). They will not only become inured to the onslaught of ubiquitous deals 24/7, they will begin to disbelieve them and cynically expect that another better deal will pop up at any moment – which they will also not trust. How can they believe what the real value of any offering is at this point? [Read more…]

What’s Missing From Online Shopping

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Last year, US e-retail sales hit $263 billion, according to Forrester Research Inc., representing 8% of total retail sales. The company predicts that by 2018, e-retail will reach $414 billion. While it’s a staggering number, it will still only account for about 11% of total retail sales. So why is online shopping still such a small piece of the retail pie? According to research from Cotton Incorporated, there’s room for improvement online.

Browse Before Buying

Though the majority of purchases still occur in-store, online is quickly becoming the first stop for consumers looking to shop for apparel. According to the Cotton Incorporated Lifestyle Monitor™ Survey, 84% of consumers say they browse for clothing online using a computer or laptop, while 45% say they use a smart phone, 39% use a tablet, and 18% use a smart television.

“We’ve seen strong growth in the percentage of consumers who browse for clothing online using smartphones, tablets, and smart televisions, and we anticipate those numbers will continue to grow as they reflect the behavior of younger consumers who were raised with the technology and are increasingly comfortable with it,” says Kim Kitchings, Vice President, Corporate Strategy & Program Metrics, Cotton Incorporated.

Indeed, according to Forrester Research Inc., 69% of US adults who regularly purchase items online end up buying about 16% of their products through e-channels, and both numbers are expected to grow as so-called “digital natives,” or those consumers born in the early 2000s after the advent of digital technologies, continue to increase their spending power. [Read more…]

Millennials in the Workplace

Stocksy_txpd54be8a1J9B000_Medium_228670Maude Standish, Trends Analyst, Millennial, and Co-Founder of Tarot, tracks cultural trends and sociological back-stories of Millennials, particularly how they view and behave in the workplace in an inter-generational workforce. To put their worldview into perspective, here are the Top Five Myths About Millennials, notably held most often by Boomers—their parents!

1. Myth: They Only Want to Be Famous

Reality: Selfies aside, Millennials are building their personal brands by documenting and commenting on their lives as they live them. They actually prioritize family and friends higher than fame. They have been exposed to a world in which fame is a double-edged sword, and fleeting at best.

2. Myth: All Millennials Are Lazy

Reality: Just because it looks like they are online all the time, whatever screen of choice, they are not lazy. Millennials are on their Grind. They work long hours. They check in online vigilantly, both professionally and personally. They are constantly planning for the future. Most Millennials have a day job and are also into some entrepreneurial business they are creating on the side.

3. Myth: They All Leave After Two Years

Reality: They all leave after two years. They leave because they didn’t see a clear career pathway to the future with the company; there was no room for creativity; there was not enough flexibility in the workplace; or they were looking for a mentor and did not find one.

4. Myth: They Are Never Really Working

Reality: They draw no lines between leisure time and work time. Millennials demand balance in their lives. So for example, seamlessly alternating between Facebook and work is a way to squeeze in personal fulfillment to balance the demands of their jobs.

5. Myth: They Have No Loyalty

Reality: Millennials have trust Issues. The recession hit, their parents were losing their pension packages, and their homes were taken. If you give them reasons to trust you—benefits, mentorship, clear examples of career paths in the firm—they will become fiercely loyal.

Some Ah-Ha Insights

  • Millennials never have to leave friends behind because of social media and online connections
  • 6 out of 10 Millennial college graduates are women
  • They are fiscally conservative because they did everything they were told, but then few jobs were available to them when they graduated, and as a result they have trust issues.
  • They are not lazy and entitled, but rather they want to be rewarded for their Grind.
  • There are more Millennials than Baby Boomers.
  • No one, no matter how old, likes to be told “you have to do it this way…”
  • The reason most Millennials think and act the way they do is because they’re YOUNG! They think and act just the way everyone else did at the same age.
  • Headphones now are replacing office doors.

Coty Sinks In Its Claws

shutterstock_152473550When it comes to spending sprees, November 2010 was a doozy for Coty, Inc. In rapid succession, the New York-based, publicly held global powerhouse scooped up the German makeup company Dr. Scheller Cosmetics AG for an undisclosed amount; the touchy-feely Philosophy skincare brand from the Carlyle Group for an estimated $1 billion; and OPI, the pro nail care line famous for lacquers with cheeky names like “Skull & Glossbones” and “Wooden Shoe Like to Know,” for another (rumored) $1 billion.

At the time of those purchases, Coty, then a $3.6 billion entity, was billing itself as the world’s largest fragrance company. By rounding out its portfolio with these brands, the plan was to reduce its reliance on the recession-plagued perfume biz, carve off a bigger slice of Germany’s beauty pie, and inch toward its stated goal of $7 billion in revenue by 2015.

While it would be hard to argue which was the splashier score— Philosophy or OPI, both of which are wildly beloved by consumers— the latter allowed Coty to not only tap an entirely new distribution channel, but also expand its foothold in the supernova that was nails circa 2010. [Read more…]

Sleepless Nights

mattress isolated on the whiteI am not sure about where you live, but around here in southeastern Pennsylvania, it seems like wherever I drive, I am never far away from a mattress store, and a discount one at that.

It makes me wonder how these stores can keep their lights on. Can there really be that many people in this community of half a million that, give or take, need a new bed? I don’t have the answer for the mushrooming growth of retail banks, but do I understand Americans have been buying mattresses in record numbers making the mattress category the fastest growing segment in the $164.4 billion home furnishings business in 2012, according to HFN’s State of the Industry report. In 2013, the mattress segment posted slower but still good growth to reach $9.4 billion.

Mattress Madness

Obviously Americans are sleeping better—or at least investing in record numbers in better beds. And with recent double-digit growth in the category, mattress retailers are trying to squeeze every bit of spring out of the mattress business. Sleepy’s tops out at over 900 stores, and 1800Mattress.com gives ‘showrooming’ mattress shoppers access to deep discounts for most of the leading brands. The leading television channels and even Walmart are getting in on retailing beds. [Read more…]

Retailers and Wholesalers: Yesterday’s Fish Wrap

Direct_to_consumerThe retail and wholesale business models, separately and in conjunction with each other, are collapsing. Along with their demise, the actual terms, retail and wholesale, will literally cease to exist. In fact, as I write this article, major traditional wholesale brands such as The North Face, Timberland and other VF Corporation brands, along with PVH brands, Calvin Klein and Tommy Hilfiger, among many other giant wholesale brands, are achieving faster and more profitable growth in what they are referring to as their DTC (direct to consumer, including e-commerce) business, than through their traditional wholesale to retail to consumer model. Essentially the DTC model that these wholesale brands are adopting is simply the branded apparel specialty retail model that was launched by the Gap, Esprit and other brands in the 1960s. A phrase often used to describe the model is “the brand on the door is the brand in the store.” Likewise, and to some degree in response to their branded wholesale vendors’ accelerating focus on the DTC model, traditional retailers — from Nordstrom and Macy’s to Walmart –- and across all retail sectors, will be forced to transform their business models to better control and accelerate their own brands’ direct engagement with consumers. In fact, Nordstrom and Macy’s, to cite two examples, are proactively beginning to transform their models. [Read more…]