Dov Charney is a Joke: A Dirty Joke and a Business Joke

Dov Charney, Portfolio, November 1, 2008The media at large has publicly exposed enough of the “dirty” part of this “jokester” that I don’t need to pile on more. Although it might be a more titillating read to add more dirt to the pile, I’ll just sign off on his disgusting behavior during his tenure as CEO of American Apparel by saying it’s equally disgusting to me that the board didn’t kick his butt out of there a long time ago. It never ceases to amaze me that too many boards are still weak on proper governance in protecting the shareholders from the egregious, deleterious behavior of miscreant CEO’s. And American Apparel’s board seems to be one of those.

But for the moment, let’s forget about Charney’s sexual proclivities, including allegations of abuse. Many top executives have been caught with their pants down, so to speak, albeit not all as flagrantly as Charney. Many were fired, yet many others have just had their dalliances swept under the rug.

Charney’s real dirty joke is that he is a business joke of the tallest order. [Read more...]

The Coming Crash of Michael Kors…Take it To The Bank

MK_Blog_graphic-01Michael Kors, the brand, is becoming ubiquitous, and that’s the kiss of death for trendy fashion brands, particularly those positioned in the up-market younger consumer sectors. Its distribution is racing towards ubiquity, wholesale and retail (online, its own stores, outlet stores and internationally). Even worse, a rocket-propelled accelerant to ubiquity is its expansion into multiple product categories and sub-brands, so they can compete at all price points. Some would argue all of those segments will simply end up competing with each other, thus cannibalizing the top end of the spectrum. [Read more...]

Chico’s Reviving and Disrupting

Chicos_Volunteer_Day_Giving_Day_006My closet is filled with a variety of on-sale purchased high-end designer clothing and shoes, nearly all black and suitable for almost every New York occasion, but not for the trip to Israel I was planning in March, 2014. I consulted my chicest, best-dressed friend, a long time fashion industry executive and insider who’d taken a similar trip a year earlier. “What clothes did you wear?” I asked, searching for wardrobe clues. “Chico’s, I think. Mostly black, matte jersey.” Chico’s!!! I couldn’t quite believe it. This is a woman who is a fashion icon, but clearly not a fashion snob. So, I followed her lead and headed to Chico’s in search of clothes that would be comfortable, suitable for multiple occasions, seasonless, packable and, dare I hope, fashionable.

What I found surprised me.

[Read more...]

Is Joe Fresh Still Fresh Enough?

IMG_2103I heard good things about Joe Fresh from a friend a couple of years ago, so I visited the Madison Avenue store, which initially opened in October, 2011 as a pop-up. It was a bright, fun place in a convenient neighborhood location. I bought a cotton V-neck cardigan in orange, Joe Fresh’s signature color, for about $19. I returned several times to buy Christmas gifts that season. Joe Fresh seemed a good resource for low priced, colorful, clean looking, basics. A poorer woman’s JCrew, perhaps a bit younger, certainly much, much cheaper — decent enough quality for the price, with a teeny bit of a contemporary edge. Joe Fresh has a much narrower, more classic and basic-focused assortment than H&M, with equally low prices, and is a refreshing, lower priced alternative to the now muddy Gap.

In 2004, Loblaw’s, Canada’s largest retailer with 1000 corporate and franchised stores, serving 14 million customers weekly, reached out to Joe Mimram, the co-founder, of Club Monaco, to create a clothing line to be sold in Loblaw’s supermarkets. Loblaw’s had extensive and successful experience with private brands, including President’s Choice, the maker of the Decadent Chocolate Chip Cookie, the number-one selling cookie in Canada. But those cookies were not enough to meet the threat of Walmart’s ever expanding Canadian Supercenters. And so, a well priced, well designed clothing line for Loblaw’s made sense. Joe Fresh was launched with women’s apparel in 40 Loblaw stores in 2006 and exceeded sales expectations. Today, Joe Fresh is sold in 340 Loblaw’s stores and includes women, children and men’s clothing, shoes, accessories, cosmetics, bath and body. In 2010, Loblaw’s launched the first Joe Fresh stand-alone store in Vancouver, and there are now 16 in Canada. [Read more...]

Will it Be Made in America?

FINAL image_Anastasia‘Made in America’ is quite the hot topic right now, grabbing up headlines left and right; from the backlash about Ralph Lauren’s 2012 Olympic uniforms (the company quickly learned its lesson—the 2014 ones were made in the US) to retail beast Walmart’s declaration to increase its purchase of American-made goods by $50 billion during the next 10 years. It’s a hopeful story—fostering patriotism while supporting the return of jobs to US soil.

There are those who say that domestic manufacturing is simply not feasible at certain price points, while others have found a significant shortage of skilled workers as a blocking point. Despite these obstacles, will apparel manufacturing sprout again in the US?

Our take is yes.

Companies are manufacturing clothing in the US today and have been for a long time. Take Martin Greenfield Clothiers, for example. The menswear company offers fine, hand-crafted tailored clothing including made-to-measure suits and tuxedos, made 100 percent by hand in its Brooklyn, New York factory. The company’s customers aren’t too shabby either—Presidents, Ambassadors, major motion pictures, the list goes on.

You may be saying, well of course a company that produces such high-end garments can charge a premium and not worry about paying extra for production. And we agree. But many companies are finding success producing in the US at all different price points. In fact, according to a recent study by Boston Consulting Group on the shift in global manufacturing, China’s manufacturing cost advantage over the US has shrunk to less than five percent, while Mexico currently has lower manufacturing costs than China. This shift highlights how American companies can now consider their home turf as a viable manufacturing option, keeping production closer to the end consumer.

Brand names like Ralph Lauren, Club Monaco, Frye and Brooks Brothers are now producing a percentage of their pieces on home turf as well. Designers like Nanette Lepore are outspoken on the topic; she organizes Save the Garment Center rallies and is vocal with lawmakers in Washington to support the American fashion industry.

America’s Research Group found that approximately 75 percent of consumers would pay more for American-made goods, up from 50 percent in 2010. Thus, people are seeing this as a business opportunity, evident by the rise of startups dedicated to US manufacturing. Look at American Giant, a direct-to-consumer apparel company that makes high-quality, affordable basics, including hoodies, t-shirts and sweatpants. After a December 2012 Slate article declared the company’s best-selling sweatshirt as the “greatest hoodie ever made,” there was a months-long waiting list. American Giant pledges to never outsource jobs overseas.

An important element to consider is the fact that this ‘repatriation’ movement isn’t unique to the US. There is also a push for ‘Made in Britain.’ British companies were dealing with the same challenges—wage increases in China, higher transportation costs, hard to control supply chains; there was also a wave of patriotism following the Olympics and the Jubilee. Many companies have been able to spark an onshoring resurgence, with Mulberry, Marks & Spencer, Topshop, Christopher Nieper and John Smedley being just a few examples.

The moral of the story is: if other higher wage countries are successfully moving toward domestic production, there’s no reason the US can’t follow suit.

We may end up eating crow because of our stance on this topic as only time will tell.

Fabric Substitution Needles Home Textile Shoppers

Preference for Cotton Remains Paramount

Click to See Chart Full-Sized

Click to See Chart Full-Sized

Housing starts and existing home sales are not only good economic indicators, but they are also strong predicators of future growth in other areas like home textiles. As the turnaround in the housing market gains steam, the home textiles market benefits – but consumers are increasingly paying higher prices for lower quality and less cotton-rich items, and they are not satisfied.

Textile World recently reported that housing starts could increase by as much as 15 to 20% over the course of 2014, despite the harsh winter, leading to potentially brisk business for the home textiles sector. While January building permits were 5.4% below the December rate, they were still 2.4% above the January 2013 estimate, according to the Department of Commerce, hinting at an upswing in the industry that could carry over to home textiles.

Cotton remains the favored fiber for home textiles like bedding and sheets; more than eight in 10 (81%) consumers prefer their sheeting to be made from cotton and cotton blends, and 75% of consumers prefer their bedding to be made from cotton and cotton blends, according to the Cotton Incorporated Lifestyle Monitor™ Survey. But that’s not always evident at retail. [Read more...]

Amazing Macy’s

Robin-Macys-illo_Rd5Not Just a Miracle – Not Just a Department Store

While JC Penney, Kohl’s and Target struggle to regain their “mojo,” or better put, to save their butts, Macy’s seems to be mojo-fueled and on a trajectory to be the last man standing. Or, are they simply stealing sales away from their befuddled competitors? The answer is a mixture of both.

The Macy’s on 34th Street today, is no miracle, nor are its recent positive (albeit aligned with a weak economy) financial results. It’s just the result of the strategic vision and methodical, complex tactical implementation of CEO Terry Lundgren and his five-star team. The store is a shopper’s delight, an audio-visual stimulating experience, one special event after another, “Black Friday,” and Christmas energy every day. Their many exclusive brands are showcased in a boutique-like shopping environment, and it’s obvious that Macy’s has evolved its brands and experience for the Millennial generation, soon to be the primary consumer segment. Over time, I expect Macy’s will spread the miracle across most of their roughly 800 doors.

Department Stores’ Last Man Standing or a Different Model?

If not “the last man standing” among department stores (an apt reference to Gary Cooper in the classic film, High Noon), Macy’s clearly created a differentiated national brand that they dominate. In a retail industry that I expect will struggle for growth between 2% to 3%, at best, for years to come, in which discounting is the weapon of necessity (Macy’s included), Macy’s is outpacing the pack with its “My Macy’s” localization strategy and ongoing pursuit of a seamlessly integrated omnichannel; plus “Magic Macy’s” elevated consumer service (including new augmented reality technology), as well as its continual focus on the “experience.”

In fact, I wish they would stop calling their business model a department store. I believe that sometime in the not too distant future the terms “wholesale” and “retail” will cease to exist as relics of the past, defining business models that are ceasing to exist. And, the classic “department store” definition will become irrelevant as well.

In the second edition, of our updated book, The New Rules of Retail, (due to be released in August), we redefine retailing into three sectors: “Omni-Brand to Consumer,” Commoditization,” and “Liquidation.” The Omni-Brand to Consumer sector is best positioned strategically for maximum competitive advantage and profitable growth.

The business models in this sector are destination brands, not nameplates. These brands are highly differentiated, including unique, mentally indelible experiences. Ultimately the brand is the creator of the largest percentage of all products and services sold (if not, they exercise dominant control). These brands will then control the distribution of its goods, including the experience, on all relevant distribution platforms, seamlessly integrated, from creation to consumption.

As Macy’s continues to evolve, in my opinion, they will begin to look like the poster child of this newly defined Omni-Brand to Consumer sector.

The Future is Now

I refer back to some quotes from an article I wrote for The Robin Report in 2011 to give context to Macy’s evolution. At the time, Lundgren commented that the massive $400 million expansion and restoration that Macy’s was undergoing, would create “a modern, customer-centric shopping experience” to reflect “how a new generation of customers prefers to shop.” His next statement was the one that really caught my attention. He said, “In many cases, product will be organized by lifestyle to help customers create looks and build wardrobes across categories.”

The significance of that last statement might have gone unnoticed by many. But Lundgren’s commitment to this lifestyle aspect of the shopping experience could well have been the first “shot across the bow” of the branded apparel specialty chains, most of which have used this same strategy to steal apparel share from department stores.

I have long speculated that if the big stores could begin to organize their products and services around lifestyle it could actually provide them a huge competitive advantage, because they already trump the branded specialists with the breadth of their selection. This merchandising reorganization speaks to an easier, more convenient shopping experience without having to traverse the maze of departments and floors.

Finally, I could not sign off in that article without offering up what could be the severest blow to the branded specialists, which would be department stores rolling out their private or exclusive brands as branded specialty chains. While Macy’s did so with their Aeropostale brand several years ago without great success, I believe it was simply ahead of its time.

How About Macy’s Mini-Mall?

So what might brand-Macy’s look like fully evolved? As I said back in 2011, Macy’s would resemble more of an enclosed mini-mall, full of go-to events, cafes, restaurants, and a collection of small, branded lifestyle shops that would be leased and run by the brand, which by the way, Mr. Lundgren was recently quoted in WWD declaring he’s “all in” and “I’m a believer” in the leased shop concept. Macy’s, the brand, would be the destination, with a mini-mall full of experiences so compelling that consumers would leave the Internet or any other store that just sells stuff.

One thing I am sure of is that even though many of Macy’s initiatives will result in echoes of its origins as a kind of a grand palace, the future is now for the department store sector. Macy’s is certainly providing a roadmap for transforming the department store into a more relevant 21st century model, defined by us as the Omni-Brand to Consumer model.

And, at the end of the day, they can call the model whatever they want, as long as consumers connect with it the moment they hear it.

How about, well … Macy’s?

Women’s Underwear is Difficult

Playtex_graphic-01A Brief History and Consumer Perspective

Women’s underwear, its euphemistic pseudonym ‘intimate apparel,’ or its more sophisticated sister, ‘lingerie,’ is difficult in so many ways. For all of us women consumers, it is a necessity; a purchase that must be made and replenished regularly. And, trust me, as a consumer who has been buying her own underwear for more years than I’d like to count, it is not always an easy, satisfying, fun, or self validating purchase.

Underwear is a category of apparel that gets us down to the bare bones of ourselves. Our bodies. Our comfort. Our sense of self. Our sex appeal. Our underpinning. The foundation for all of our clothes. Women’s underwear has been marketed to us for generations reflecting deep-seated emotions and attitudes about ourselves, our roles, and our history as women. From long before the time women discarded their bras in the late 1960s as a symbol of second-wave feminism, bras have had a history of women’s emancipation and independence. In 1873, writer and activist, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, wrote: “Burn up the corsets! … No, nor do you save the whalebones; you will never need whalebones again. Make a bonfire of the cruel steels that have lorded it over your thorax and abdomens for so many years and heave a sigh of relief, for your emancipation I assure you, from this moment has begun…” [Read more...]

Reaching the Chinese Consumer

China continues to top the AT Kearney Retail Apparel Index, which shows the top 10 emerging countries viable for the retail sector. Strong growths in population and in income make it an increasingly attractive market for western brands looking to expand. Yet reaching the Chinese consumer poses unique challenges.

According to Euromonitor International, Chinese clothing expenditures are projected to nearly double within the next 10 years, from 1.2 trillion in 2012 to 2.2 trillion in 2020. Even in 2011, a year of slower than predicted growth, Chinese real GDP still amounted to 51.1 trillion RMB.

And while the Chinese population is expected to grow 2% by 2020, income growth will continue to outpace population growth — which means more consumers with more buying power. Per capita disposable income is expected to grow 75% between 2012 and 2020, according to projections made by Euromonitor International.

As the population continues to grow, though, it is also shifting towards more urban areas. This stands to benefit western retailers first expanding into larger cities, since urban consumers tend to spend more on discretionary purchases like apparel and textiles. [Read more...]

China Seeks Low-Cost Production

china_factory_main.top copyIn the United States

Beware of what you wish for. For all of the “pollyannas” who have been rooting for manufacturing jobs returning to the good old USA from low-cost countries such as China, they may just be getting their wish; but not in the way they intended.  It will end badly.

In a perverse kind of irony, it appears that the United States may be evolving into a low-cost country, wooing China-based manufacturers to set up shop here — at least in the textile and yarn industries — which the US lost to Asia and the Far East in the 70s and 80s.

In fact, several Chinese yarn and textile manufacturing businesses have already moved to the United States, primarily in the southern states where the manufacturing skills still reside and where most of those textile jobs were lost to lower-cost countries. The region also has state and local governments eager to boost their economies and decrease unemployment, and willing to provide significant tax breaks, bonds to defray project costs, grants, and job-development credits. [Read more...]

Now It’s The Post-Prep Digital Menswear Evolution?

nicksplash1Remember when Nick Graham launched a rocket into space with a pair of his Joe Boxer brand shorts in the nose cone? Or, were you there when he did the first live-streaming fashion show (from an airline hanger in Iceland?) Regretfully, I was invited but couldn’t attend. Or, how about when he launched one of the first fashion industry websites; wove the Joe Boxer URL into the elastic of his underwear; installed the world’s largest live ticker-email sign in New York’s Times Square; and sold the world’s first cyber-scooter in the Neiman Marcus Christmas catalogue.

During the early 90s, Nick Graham, an early adopter of technology, connected his cyber-vision to his meteoric Joe Boxer brand and one outrageous and hysterical event after another.  Indeed, his mantra, ‘The brand is the amusement park, the product is the souvenir,’ was the DNA of the Joe Boxer brand.

And, now he’s at it again. [Read more...]

Crime, Punishment & Retailing

African street vendorOrganized retail crime is escalating, but can law enforcement cope with a global crime spree and a new class of criminal?

When I was eight years old, me, and two equally nefarious friends, decided to hit the local Woolworth. The objective? The new Duncan yo-yo and two green plastic, spacegun-shaped waterguns.

My guys—not exactly Goodfellas—were supposed to distract the cashier and stock boy, but took a powder when they saw the manager grab me by the shoulder. Half an hour later amid threats of prison, my mother picked me up, smacked me on the head and dragged me home where I faced the dreaded “wait ‘til your father gets home” scenario.

So much for my criminal career! [Read more...]