Judith Russell

About Judith Russell

Judith Russell is a marketing and strategic planning consultant specializing in the retail apparel industry, and writes for several apparel and retail trade publications.

Why L Brands CEO Les Wexner Needs to Spend a Day in London

Victoria's Secret Fashion Show - RunwayVictoria’s Secret, the $7 billion brand known for its sexy lingerie, scantily dressed models and world-famous intimate apparel runway show, is opening more than a hundred new stores this year in Asia, Europe and other international markets.

Shoppers heading there to buy the latest Dream Angel bra and panty will be disappointed, however, because these stores carry little or no lingerie.

Yes, you read that right. Of the approximately 130 new Victoria’s Secret stores slated to open overseas in 2015, 120 will be Victoria’s Secret Beauty and Accessories (VSBA) stores, carrying fragrance and accessories. The stores are financed and operated by franchise partners who pay L Brands (LB) a royalty based on sales volume. Early this year, several of these stores opened in China, a key future market for the company. Most of them are in airports, and bear the Victoria’s Secret nameplate, just like their fully-assorted older sisters. [Read more…]

Retail’s Walking Dead: These Brands Have Been Revived, But Will They Survive?

zombiesThere’s a hit TV show, “The Walking Dead,”  in which a nasty plague wipes out almost the entire human race, then allows some of the decaying departed to get up, roam around, and attempt to eat the few still-living folks, who from then on spend their days and nights in a constant, terrifying quest for survival.

It’s hard not to see the parallels in retail.

Over the past year or so, several defunct retail brands, like Radio Shack, Fortunoff, and others, have been reincarnated. But unlike in the AMC show,  where we don’t know what’s allowing the zombies to keep stumbling forward, we do know what’s allowing these retailers to start moving again: all the cash sloshing around in the coffers of investors who seem to believe these brands still have a future. [Read more…]

I’m Worth it!

Worth Summer Campaign_My House is More Than a HomeBrand’s High-Touch, High-Tech Service Business Model Attracts Busy, Fashion-Conscious Women

As the apparel sector gravitates toward cheaper products, relentless promotions, and declining service, a very different microtrend is taking hold. Direct-to-consumer luxury apparel company Worth Collection Ltd. is providing hands-on service with a high-tech twist — and no discounting.

When she answered the door at the Worth New York showroom on New York’s West 57th Street, Dana Kendrick took only a few minutes to size me up — literally and figuratively. “You’re a size 2,” she announced, “and you like classic, updated styles and dark or neutral colors.”

The stylist ushered me into a beautifully paneled room lined with racks of clothing samples from which she began to pull a selection of items. Then the questions started. Was I looking primarily for clothes for work or for social events? Have I thought about wearing color around my face? What are my most urgent wardrobe needs? [Read more…]

Let’s Get Physical

letsgetphysicalThe Real Reason E-Commerce Merchants are Opening Stores

When asked why he robs banks, the notorious Willy Sutton answered: “Because that’s where the money is.”

Several high-profile e-commerce merchants are venturing into the world of brick-and- mortar for the same reason. Bonobos, Trunk Club, Nasty Gal, Warby Parker, Rent the Runway and Birchbox are just a few of the big e-names opening stores. Though they tout them as an invaluable way to showcase their brands and engage with consumers, it turns out these shops might also be an unavoidable route to reaching their financial potential.

Late in the Aughts, when most of these companies came into being, venture capital was plentiful for tech businesses, which is how they were positioned. But today, pure-play e-commerce is so last decade. [Read more…]

Urban Legend

Stocksy_txp50011d0dXEG000_Medium_456973_2For more than four decades, Urban Outfitters Inc.’s namesake brand has been a favorite among hip young adults in search of edgy products and a cool place to hang out. Though its brand ethos is the envy of many in the apparel world, sales have until recently been on the decline, and the company has had to face the fact that having customers spend more time chilling in its stores doesn’t necessarily increase sales. So what’s an iconic brand to do?

Urban Decay

At the new Urban Outfitters store in Herald Square, steps from the Macy’s flagship at the southernmost edge of New York’s historic garment district, two 20-something women with multiple tattoos and pink ponytails fondled a fur-trimmed suede coat priced at $248. “I love it,” said one, holding the coat up in front of a full-length mirror. “I just don’t know if I love it enough.” [Read more…]

Where Has All the Luxury Gone?

Coach StoreWe in the industry have been bandying about the term “luxury” pretty freely of late, but there is growing realization that if a product or brand is easily accessible and relatively inexpensive, it’s not really a “luxury” product. And the minute you add the term “affordable,” it becomes an oxymoron.

As the ever-widening income inequality gap illustrates, the rich are still getting richer. According to Pew Research, the top 1% of households in the US, or those making $400K or more annually, earn 23% of the total income in the country, and control 35% of the net worth. Both figures have been steadily growing for more than a decade.

One ever-present behavior in the spending habits of the superrich of any generation is opting for the special over the mundane. Makers of high-end jewelry and electronics, cars, exotic vacation hotels, and other products and services target this group of discerning consumers for a reason: They value, and are willing to pay a steep premium for, that which is appreciated by and accessible to only an elite few.

Milton Pedraza, CEO of The Luxury Institute, a research firm that tracks and advises the global luxury goods market, says that consumers consistently define luxury as the best of design, quality, craftsmanship, and service. Brands that always deliver against these attributes, including Audemars Piguet, Chanel, and Buccellati, also tend to have a compelling brand heritage story. [Read more…]

Holy Guacamole: Millennial Favorite Chipotle Turns Neurological Connectivity into Gastronomical Addiction

chipotleMy 16-year-old son John’s idea of a gourmet meal is a burger and fries, so I was surprised one evening a couple of weeks ago when, after a busy day that left me no time to cook, I asked him where we should get takeout, and his answer was: “Chipotle.”

Caught off guard, I had to think for a minute. “I don’t think there’s one nearby.”

“Yes there is, in Yonkers,” he said, then added sheepishly,“ and you told me I could choose where to go.” Sighing, I grabbed my purse and keys for the 20-minute drive.

Chipotle (named after a smoke-dried jalapeno pepper) is the wildly successful chain of casual Mexican-style restaurants known for its overstuffed burritos made from healthy and natural ingredients. It was founded more than 20 years ago by Stephen Ells, a graduate of the University of Colorado and the Culinary Institute of America who,  with the dream of someday opening his own restaurant, moved to San Francisco to work for a famous chef . One day, he noticed an assembly line of workers at a taqueria in the Mission District  efficiently serving a crowd of hungry customers. He decided he could open a similar place to generate the cash needed to fund his fancy dining establishment. He quit his job, moved back to Denver and, after borrowing $85,000 from his dad, opened the first Chipotle in mid-1993. The restaurant, which from the start operated on the principle that fast food doesn’t have to be low-quality and that delicious food doesn’t have to be expensive, offered crafted-to-order burritos made from fresh, locally-sourced ingredients. Within six months, the restaurant was reportedly selling 1,000 burritos per day, 10 times the level needed to break even. [Read more…]

Santa Will Be Leaving Coal in Retailers’ Stockings This Year

This week the Department of Commerce published September retail sales figures, and despite all the jabber about a solid back-to-school season, sales growth slowed considerably during the month.

Total retail sales rose by 4.3% to $444 billion, their most sluggish rate in seven months on a 12-month smoothed basis. Every major sector of retail saw a decline in sales growth compared to earlier in the year.

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Automobiles, which if you’ll pardon the pun have been driving retail sales growth for the past four years, increased by 9.5%. Taking autos out of the mix, retail sales gained only 3%, and general merchandise sales rose by 2.7%.

Department and discount stores saw sales fall by almost one percent, while apparel specialty store sales rose by one percent on a 12-month smoothed basis. [Read more…]

Bursting the Bubble on August Retail Sales

BTN-9-16-14Last Friday the Department of Commerce released its August retail sales figures. Total sales rose 5% compared to August of 2013.

The business and economic media heralded the news and what it might mean for retail sales performance over the next several months. The New York Times decided that the 70% of GDP growth dependent on consumer spending would be buoyed by this clear message that consumers are fed up with being cautious and poised to open their collective wallet in a big way.

A look behind the numbers tells a slightly different story, however.

Auto sales were responsible for most of the gain. Sales at automobile dealers and parts stores grew by almost 9% to $90 billion, representing over 20% of total retail sales. Retailers of health and personal care products enjoyed an 8% increase, but represent less than 6% of all retail sales. Sales at non-store, or pure-play e-commerce, retailers grew by 7%.

Department stores, apparel specialty stores, off-pricers and other purveyors of non-auto and discretionary goods, however, posted sales growth that underperformed the average. Apparel specialty stores got only a 3.2% pop from back-to-school. Food and beverage store sales rose by 3.6% compared to last year, boosted by rising prices in some key product categories. General merchandise store sales were up by less than 2%, depressed by a 1% drop in department, chain and specialty stores. [Read more…]

The Hidden Message in How Americans Spend

Consumer spending increased by 3.7% in June, the highest 12-month smoothed monthly increase in almost two years, according to data released last week by the Bureau of Economic Analysis.

This year, Americans will spend $12 trillion on stuff, slightly more than the $11.7 trillion they spent on stuff last year.

These gross numbers are pretty meaningless and hard to wrap one’s mind around, but if we look behind the big numbers at what we’re spending our money on, and how some of those expenditures are growing, it’s not only pretty interesting, but can also tell us about how optimistic we’re feeling, about our consumer preferences as a society, and where we might be headed.

When the government tracks consumer spending, it creates two major categories: goods, which are separated into durables like cars and washing machines, and nondurables like clothes and food; and services, such as private school tuition, cab fare, eating in restaurants, and going to the doctor.

What I’d like to do here, though, is to categorize them a little differently.

pyramid2

Abraham Maslow (remember him from Psychology 101?) created the theory of the hierarchy of needs; simply stated that self-actualization is not possible until our basic needs are met. So, using a pyramid as a model, shelter, food and clothing (physiological needs) are the most basic needs at the base.

Fast forward to the top, creativity and artistic pursuits, are defined as self-actualization, or achieving our full potential as human beings. I’m super-simplifying here, but you get the idea. So if we look at trends in consumer spending through a redefined prism of Maslow’s hierarchy, and taking a few liberties with the climb to the top, some interesting patterns emerge. We can start with non-discretionary (need) categories like food, clothing and shelter at the base, and discretionary purchases, (more wants than needs) like restaurant dinners and new cars at the top.

So how have Americans been spending their money? And what’s behind these spending trends? [Read more…]

June Retail Sales: A Good News, Bad News Story for Merchants

Last week the US Department of Commerce released its most recent monthly sales and inventory figures for the retail industry. Total sales rose to almost $448 billion in June, up from $422 billion in June of last year, a seasonally adjusted increase of 5.2% on a 12-month smoothed basis (which is not a straight average, but a calculation that takes into account several months of data so that it conveys a more accurate idea of trend). Total retail inventory rose by 3.6% in May, the most recent month for which inventory data are available, and the smallest monthly increase in almost three years, sending the inventory-to-sales ratio edging down for the month.

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Whether or not the news was good for you depends largely on what business sector you’re in. If you’re in a well-run business selling automobiles or health and beauty aids, you probably saw your sales grow. If you’re selling food, apparel, electronics, home furnishing or most other discretionary consumer products, then you’re probably having a considerably different experience. [Read more…]

CVS: Blowing Smoke? Or Truly Concerned for our Health?

Judy-CVS_FINAL-imageI resent the fact that I can’t walk down a street in New York City without breathing in a potentially lethal amount of second-hand smoke. So imagine my satisfaction when, on February 5, CVS announced it was going to cease selling tobacco products at its 7,600 stores by October 1.

CVS Loses a Loyal Customer

I became a CVS customer about 30 years ago. I found the stores conveniently located, bright, clean, and easy to shop. The product assortment was excellent and well-priced, and the ExtraCare loyalty program, of which I was a charter member, was terrific. I started shopping there for my prescription and over-the-counter medications, health and beauty aids, and vitamins, eventually expanding to cereal, juice, sundries, holiday candy, and school supplies. As the years went on, I did a greater portion of our family shopping there, and each quarter I would receive a generous coupon of “extra bucks” — free money to spend in the store. [Read more…]